twitter

Twitter began life as a public company today as it started trading on the New York Stock Exchange in the most closely watched initial public offering of the year.

The San Francisco-based company priced its shares on Wednesday at $26 a piece. It will raise about $2.1bn by selling 80.5m shares, or about 13 per cent of the company.

The shares closed up 73 per cent at $44.90.

 

If there were any remaining doubts that Twitter wanted to contrast its initial public offering with that of Facebook’s, consider the way the messaging platform is running its investor roadshow.

Last May, Mark Zuckerberg donned his trademark “hoodie” and strode through the main entrance of the Sheraton Hotel, where the lobby was flooded with network reporters, cameraman and journalists. The media flurry surrounded not just the Facebook founder but also would-be investors.

But here on the 36th floor of the Midtown Manhattan Mandarin Oriental hotel in the lush Time Warner Center just off Central Park West, I am the only reporter in sight, writes Arash MassoudiRead more

Hannah Kuchler

Twitter released an updated version of its initial public offering filing on Tuesday afternoon in the US, announcing it will list on the NYSE and giving details about its last three months as a private company.

Here are five things you need to know from the messaging platform’s release:

1. Losses are mounting. Net losses widened significantly from June to September, rising from $70m in the first six months, to $134m for the first nine months as the cost of revenue increased. Read more

Hannah Kuchler

Twitter took advantage of the new Jobs Act to file the drafts of its initial public offering document in secret, denying journalists and investors the chance to watch its rough and tumble with the SEC.

But when the registration document was published on Thursday, the SEC also revealed the draft filings Twitter had made since it filed in private way back in July. There’s no big secret hiding here but a few interesting changes that give an indication of what Twitter may have been talking to the SEC about – although of course, they could have just decided to change it themselves. Read more

As Twitter’s IPO cranks into action, there is one big question that is puzzling beyondbrics and many others: where are the non-US users based?

In its SEC filing, Twitter admitted that “users outside the US constituted 77 per cent of our average MAUs [monthly active users] in the three months ended June 30, 2013″. Just who are the 77 per cent? And can Twitter make money out of them?

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Hannah Kuchler

Ladies and gentleman, the moment you have all been waiting for is fast-approaching: Twitter is due to file the small print on its initial public offering, a bulky S-1 registration statement that will allow investors a peek into the messaging platform’s business.

Here is the Financial Times “Ctrl-F” guide to getting the news fast (Alternatively, please tune in to FT.com when it happens, where we’ll do the heavy lifting for you): Read more

Hannah Kuchler

The much-anticipated Twitter IPO (TwIPO?) has arrived. Twitter chose to announce it, of course, on its own site:

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Robert Cookson

A disgruntled British Airways passenger has bought adverts on Twitter to complain about the airline’s customer service, in an unusual reversal of the way that big brands use social media.

Hasan Syed, a businessman who goes by the Twitter username @HVSVN, took the action on Monday out of frustration with the way that British Airways was handling his father’s lost luggage. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Trading may have been halted on Nasdaq-listed stocks but the tweets were still flowing on Twitter.

Step forward Carl Icahn, the activist investor, who picked this moment to update his 67,000 followers on his campaign to persuade Apple to hike its share buybackRead more

Tim Bradshaw

Many thought that Instagram’s addition of 15-second videos to its photo-sharing app would kill Vine, Twitter’s fledgling video app.

Apparently not.

Twitter on Tuesday said that 40m people have signed up to watch and share six-second videos on Vine. Read more