Yahoo

First, the good news: Yahoo’s latest appointment of a chief executive was handled with the minimum of chaos. The arrival this week of experienced Google product manager Marissa Mayer wasn’t preceded by the usual barrage of leaks and second-guessing.

The bad news is that given the turmoil Yahoo has been through recently, the hapless internet company has had too much practice at getting this sort of thing right. Including interim holders of the title, she is the fourth CEO in less than a year. Yahoo was overdue, finally, for a smooth transition.

 

Tim Bradshaw

Yahoo’s appointment of Marissa Mayer as its new chief executive had already been lauded by many in the technology industry as a “coup” for the beleaguered internet company.

But as more details emerge of the appointment, the oft-criticised Yahoo board is likely to win praise from a wider constituency – one that normally only pays attention to Silicon Valley to point out the dismal ratio of male to female executives.

Ms Mayer, 37, is six months pregnant with her first child. “Another piece of good news today,” she tweeted.  

Stress balls, breath mints, cupcakes and a sponsored “oxygen bar”: yes, it’s Internet Week in New York, the annual feast of branded freebies, parties and panels for the city’s digital media and marketing set.

Today a Yahoo presentation drew the biggest crowd at the warehouse-like SoHo venue. Some were clearly there for an address on “big data” by Billy Beane, the number-crunching general manager of the Oakland A’s baseball team and inspiration for Brad Pitt’s character in Moneyball

Richard Waters

With Yahoo’s board meeting to discuss the latest in a seemingly endless series of crises to overtake its top leadership, CEO Scott Thompson has issued an apology.

Not for the “inadvertent error” that led to his qualification-inflation. And not even for Yahoo’s overly casual use of that phrase last week, which was denounced by dissident investor Third Point as “insulting to shareholders.” 

Richard Waters

A month ago, we marveled at how Facebook had stitched together a defence against Yahoo’s patent attack with what might best be called an “old, new, borrowed and blue” legal strategy.

It turns out Yahoo’s lawyers were thinking the same thing: in a new complaint, they take direct aim at Facebook’s rush to build a patent war chest (which most recently involved a $550m purchase from Microsoft.)      

Richard Waters

Two researchers from Dutch electronics group Philips, a professor at New York University, an independent inventor in San Jose – and a certain Mark Zuckerberg.

These are some of the people whose assembled brainpower Facebook has drawn on to defend itself against Yahoo’s patent infringement case. If successful, it will count as one of the most effective legal defences mounted by a young internet concern that until recently had little in the way of patent reserves to draw on. 

Chris Nuttall

RSS readers used to be the standard way for web users to collect and consume news from different sources, but the advent of tablets has brought personalised photo-rich magazine-style experiences rather than long RSS lists of headlines.

With traditional journalism in decline, the seven news aggregators reviewed here make a case that bots and social networks may be able to take the place of good editors by automatically providing a rich and more personalised news experience. 

Tim Bradshaw

Tech news from around the web:

Yahoo‘s new chief executive Scott Thompson has a long to-do list waiting for him at the troubled internet company, according to several reports. Bloomberg suggests that Yahoo is interested in acquiring the Weather Channel, WebMD and AutoTrader.com, according to an anonymous source, as part of a “tax-efficient asset swap” with Alibaba and Softbank. 

Maija Palmer

Tech news from around the web:

Yahoo, the struggling internet company, is on the verge of appointing a new chief executive, writes Kara Swisher of AllThingsD, with Scott Thomson, president of eBay’s PayPal business, expected to get the nod. An announcement could come as early as Wednesday. Yahoo has been without a permanent CEO since firing Carol Bartz last September. The company has been run by its board and Tim Morse, its former chief financial officer, while looking at a range of strategic options including a sale of all or part of the company. 

Richard Waters

Yahoo just moved another step forward in its bid to control the end-game that has been taking shape around its future.

Silver Lake has agreed to enter into confidential discussions with the US internet company, making it the latest private equity firm to go this route – and potentially robbing Alibaba and Softbank of an ally as they consider making a play for Yahoo themselves. But it’s still far too early to call it “game over”.