Daily Archives: January 25, 2012

Esther Bintliff

An Occupy WEF protestor builds an igloo to protest against against the World Economic Forum (WEF) on January 23, 2012 in the Swiss Alpine resort of Davos. Photo: VINCENZO PINTO/AFP/Getty Images

VINCENZO PINTO/AFP/Getty Images

As highlighted in Gillian Tett’s post last night, and Jasmine Whitbread’s post in our rolling blogincome inequality is a big issue demanding the attention of Davos delegates this year, whether they like it or not.

So, we organised a quick email Q&A with David Roth, the spokesman for OccupyWEF, asking him to tell us why he’s protesting this year and what he hopes to achieve. Here’s what he had to say. Do add your comments below. Read more >>

FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

Welcome to the FT’s rolling coverage of the World Economic Forum. By Esther Bintliff and Claire Jones in London, with contributions from FT editors and writers in Davos.

18.30 That’s it for day 1 of our Davos rolling blog.

The eurozone crisis dominated proceedings, but Merkel’s speech was a bit of a let-down by most accounts, notably Martin Wolf’s (see post at 17.25).

Income inequality was another talking point – see posts at 13.45  and 15.00 and Gillian Tett’s blog here.

This evening delegates can catch a screening of “The Lady” with director Luc Besson, find out their social network status, or share a nightcap with “the princess of Africa”, singer and president of the Princess of Africa Foundation Yvonne Ntombizodwa Chaka Chaka.

Join us again tomorrow at 07.30 when we’ll bring you more trenchant analysis, quotes (both vacuous and profound), and hats from the slopes of Davos.

18.11 A tip from the FT’s banking editor Patrick Jenkins: if you’re going to Davos never book a hotel in Klosters. Read more >>

By Gillian Tett

When the World Economic Forum published its annual risk assessment report earlier this month, it featured a fascinating detail: for the first time ever, the issue of “income disparity” featured on the list of risks that WEF members expected to see this year.

More startling, this risk actually topped the list, beating out issues such as financial collapse, fiscal crisis or environmental issues. Welcome to a theme that I expect to crop up repeatedly in debate this week in Davos.

As the annual WEF meeting gets underway, the Occupy Wall Street movement has not yet stormed any cocktail parties (although I am told that protesters have built an igloo). But the issue of social and political protest is creeping into debate, even amid the canapés and wine. Read more >>