Daily Archives: January 30, 2014

Gideon Rachman

Israel has enjoyed a quiet few years. No wars, no intifada, no increase in the international pressure on the Israeli state – and a strong economy. With the rest of the Middle East in flames, it has been hard to make the traditional argument that the Israeli-Palestinian question is the key to solving all other issues – or to argue that the plight of the Palestinians is the most urgent human-rights priority in the region.

But Israel’s quiet times may be about to end. The Scarlett Johansson controversy is just one part of it – the less important part, in fact. The other really significant element is that John Kerry seems to be about to launch his peace plan. When Kerry does that it will put Israel on the spot and may split its government. And if and when the talks fail (as I’m afraid, they surely will), Israel is likely to get a lot of the blame. The country will be back in the spotlight – and not in a good way. Read more

By Toby Luckhurst

  • Martin Taylor examines the perennial technical problems that plague modern banks.
  • The number of Saudi women in work has almost doubled in the last six years, as rising living costs render the tradition of the male breadwinner untenable.
  • Turkey more than doubled its weekly repo rate to combat rising inflation.
  • The International Energy Agency has warned that Europe faces decades of higher energy prices, which could be ruinous to industry competitiveness.
  • The Mafia has been dumping rubbish north of Naples, polluting the area so badly that locals refer to it as the “Triangle of Death”.

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By Toby Luckhurst
Europe is beset by rising energy prices, driven by the increasing competitiveness of shale production in the US, political commitments to lower emissions and an over-reliance on Russia in the wake of unrest in the Middle East and North Africa.

Britain’s Big Six, the six dominant energy companies, face accusations of overcharging, but they in turn claim that prohibitive emissions targets and governmental “green levies” are to blame for the price increase. While the US is benefiting from a shale gas boom that is predicted to give it an edge over both the EU and China for the next two decades, fracking is struggling to take off in Europe due to high costs, geological difficulties and public ambivalence to the environmentally destructive production methods. European politicians are considering abandoning the 2030 renewable energy targets in light of these high costs.

These articles analyse the causes of and possible solutions to Europe’s energy crisis. Read more