Daily Archives: March 19, 2014

Europe’s response to the Crimean crisis
Ben Hall is joined by Peter Spiegel, Brussels bureau chief and Neil Buckley, East Europe editor to discuss Europe’s response to Russia’s summary annexation of Crimea, the first such grab for sovereign territory by a European nation since the second world war. President Vladimir Putin’s move has prompted outrage in European capitals, and the muscular tone of his speech to the Duma on Tuesday will have triggered some alarm about Russian intentions. But Europe’s response so far seems timid, as governments weigh their economic interests with standing up to Russian aggression.

Royal Malaysian air force navigator Captain Izam Fareq Hassan during a search and rescue operation

By Amie Tsang and Mark Odell

The jetliner that went missing on March 8 has proved to be a Rorschach test for air safety fears and concerns. The lack of intelligence means the investigation now spans oceans measuring 2.2m square nautical miles and land roughly equal to two-thirds of the landmass of continental US. However, the insatiable appetite for the latest news on the mystery, not to mention the fact that 239 people remain missing, has elicited theories that range from glorifying the heroic pilot to suspecting him of terrorism. 

♦ Farhan Bokhari speaks to those on the front line as the Taliban tightens its grip on Pakistan society.

♦ After annexing Crimea, Russia moves to carve up the spoils. Guy Chazan reports from Simferopol.

♦ Russia’s revanchism has to be stopped, even for Russia’s own sake, argues Martin Wolf.

♦ Putin’s well-trained, stealthy army is not like the feeble one that invaded Afghanistan, warns David Ignatius in The Washington Post.

Reuters’ Breaking Views asks whether the eurozone should heed Japan’s deflation lessons

By Stefan Wagstyl

All this talk of fascism: the most abused and overused word in the political dictionary is once again being royally abused and overused.

For weeks, Russian propaganda has portrayed the protesters in the Kiev Maidan as fascist, along with the interim government, and most of western Ukraine. Now Oleksander Turchynov, Ukraine’s interim president, has returned the compliment – and called Russian president Vladimir Putin a fascist.