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Here’s your weekly US politics wrap-up:

President-elect Donald Trump embarked on a victory tour on Thursday, with a plan to stop in the swing states that had unexpectedly delivered him the White House. Read more

Cuba after Castro

Will Fidel Castro’s influence over Cuba outlast his death, and will the Trump presidency reverse the detente with the US begun by Barack Obama? Gideon Rachman puts these questions to John Paul Rathbone, the FT’s Latin America editor, and Geoff Dyer, Washington correspondent.

By Gideon Rachman

People who are worried by the prospect of President Donald Trump are often reminded of the checks and balances in the American system. The US president is not a dictator. He is constrained by the constitution, the courts and the Congress.

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Events in Latin America this week signalled that tempestuous times in the region show no sign of abating – literally and figuratively. Read more

Fillon is surprise favourite of French conservative voters

François Fillon, a former prime minister, looks on course to become the surprise presidential candidate of the centre-right in next year’s French presidential elections. James Wilson asks Anne-Sylvaine Chassany, Paris correspondent, and Ben Hall, world news editor, what his appeal is and how he would fare in a contest against the far-right populist leader Marine Le Pen.

By Gideon Rachman

This time last year, I wrote that “I have a nightmare vision for 2017: President Trump, President Le Pen, President Putin.” So, after Donald Trump’s victory, the next question is whether Marine Le Pen can indeed capture the French presidency?

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Plan B. That was the recurring theme in Latin America this week as Mexico tries to prepare for whatever a Donald Trump presidency will bring; China tries to recalibrate Asia-Pacific trade; and Colombia and Farc rebels try another stab at peace. Read more

Donald Trump and Europe: friend or foe?

Does the election victory of Donald Trump represent an opportunity or a threat to Europe? Gideon Rachman discusses the mixed reaction across the continent with George Parker, the FT’s political editor in London, and diplomatic correspondent Arthur Beesley in Brussels.

By Gideon Rachman

What is going on between Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump? That question hung over the US election. Now that Mr Trump has won the presidency, the question of his relationship with the Russian leader assumes global significance.

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The Mexican peso crumpled, the Cuban army began military maneuvers, Colombia’s “No” vote campaigners cheered, Peru’s president probably wished he had not joked about cutting ties with Washington if Donald Trump won, while the rest of the region congratulated the US president-elect through gritted teeth. “Here’s to @realDonaldTrump’s victory,” Evo Morales, the president of Bolivia, tweeted sarcastically. “We hope to work against racism, machismo and anti-immigration for the sovereignty of our peoples.” Brazil’s Foreign Ministry sent a curiously unsigned message, with bland bromides about “working together” and “new opportunities”. Read more

The transition to the Donald Trump presidency has begun, after the businessman travelled to the White House to meet Barack Obama today, with the possibility that the president-elect could undo huge swathes of the president’s legacy is in the air.

The pair struck a conciliatory tone. But the image of the first black president preparing to hand over power to the man who had led a racist crusade to delegitimise him as un-American was striking, writes Jelani CobbRead more

Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump Holds Election Night Event In New York City

Donald Trump became US president-elect after winning one of the most divisive elections in US history, and US markets responded positively after the stunning result had initially hit markets in Europe and Asia, while peaceful protests were sparked in urban centres around America

Key points

  • Republican Donald Trump surged past the required 270 votes needed to win. Read our coverage of how it happened here.

  • Trump: “Now it’s time for America to bind the wounds of division.”

  • US stock market forges ahead and Asian markets bounce back on Day 2 after an initial sharp sell-off

  • The yield on the 10-year Treasury note jumped by the most in more than three years

  • Mexican President Peña Nieto joins world leaders in taking a conciliatory tone

  • President Barack Obama promises a “smooth transition”

  • Hillary Clinton congratulates her rival and “offers to work with him”

 

The US – and the world – was still reeling the day after the surprise victory of Donald Trump. The Federal Reserve was facing the possibility of a policy shake-up from Mr Trump, who has been critical of the central bank, but markets defied the panic that gripped them the night before, with the Dow climbing to a near all-time closing high.

Hillary Clinton struck a conciliatory note in her concession speech on Wednesday morning: “we owe him an open mind and the chance to lead”. It is likely that she will have won the popular vote by about 1-2 per cent when all the votes in California have been counted. Read more

Trump win stuns America’s allies

Donald Trump’s momentous victory has stunned America’s allies but also delighted populists and strongmen leaders around the world, notably Russia’s Vladimir Putin. Ben Hall discusses the world response with Gideon Rachman and Guy Chazan.

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He called himself “Mr Brexit”. He promised a “Brexit times ten”. Uncharacteristically for Donald Trump, he may have undersold it.

Trump has upended not just the political world, but the polling industry, the media, prediction markets, the GOP and Democratic establishments and the entire geopolitical order by pulling off the most improbable win in US historyRead more

Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump Holds Election Night Event In New York City

One of the most divisive presidential contests in US history ended dramatically on Wednesday morning with Donald Trump winning the White House.

Key points

  • Donald Trump surged past the required 270 votes needed to win by 2:33AM EST.

  • Hillary Clinton called Mr Trump to congratulate him on his victory, but did not make an appearance at her campaign event in New York City.

  • Mr Trump addressed supporters at his own campaign event in New York City, with an appeal to unity, saying it is “time for America to bind the wounds of division”.

 

MAS_US-elections-2

Voting is underway in one of the most divisive US presidential elections in history that will see either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump win the White House.

Key points

  • Polls close from 6pm EST (11pm GMT) through to 1am ET across the country

  • The FT’s poll of polls gives Clinton a 3.3 point lead nationally

  • Focus is on a handful of battleground states where candidates are 5 points or less apart.

  • Our results coverage starts at 6pm EST; bookmark our live results page for later

  • Read our live coverage as the results come in

 

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Well, this is it. Americans are at the polls. Results will start rolling in in a few hours, so keep our live results page open to get a real-time sense of whether Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump comes out on top in one of the most dramatic and divisive campaigns in US history.

 Read more

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In just over 24 hours, our long national nightmare will be over.

I kid. It probably won’t be over for a handful of hours after that, when the first returns start trickling in. Or maybe days after that if there’s a recount in any of the many toss-up states or if the losing candidate decides to contest the results.

 Read more

Labeling a politician a fascist is not usually helpful. The word is chucked around so much that it has lost most of its explanatory force. As long ago as 1944, George Orwell wrote that – “It will be seen that, as used, the word ‘Fascism’ is almost entirely meaningless …I have heard it applied to farmers, shopkeepers, Social Credit, corporal punishment, fox-hunting … Kipling, Gandhi, Chiang Kai-Shek … and I do not know what else.”

And yet, this US presidential election has seen some of America’s most prominent political commentators describe Donald Trump as a fascist. So does the Republican candidate deserve this description? Might America, indeed, be on the brink of electing a fascist as its next president? Read more