♦ The conflict in South Sudan has exposed the naivety of those self-appointed cheerleaders of southern independence abroad, who argued that all other issues were secondary to sovereignty, says the FT’s William Wallis.
♦ It’s time to think more about Sarajevo and less about Munich when it comes to international affairs, argues Gideon Rachman.
♦ The New York Times looks at how Palestinians find fun and escape while facing everyday life in the Israeli-controlled West Bank and the Hamas-controlled Gaza.
♦ Germany is addressing the issue of integration and equality for its large Muslim population – state schools are offering classes on Islam in a bid to quell the radicalisation of Muslims and prejudice among non-Muslims. Read more

Turkey’s finance minister warns of negative implications for the country’s economy as a corruption scandal engulfs Ankara’s political elite, triggering a slide in the lira.
♦ The uncommon success of the “Common Man” party has upended Indian politics.
♦ Take a look at these photographs showing construction at the Panama Canal.
♦ The increasing cost and shortage of housing has led people to make more and more of less and less space: CNN takes a look at “micro-homes”.
♦ Businessweek looks at the money wasted on the Sochi OlympicsRead more

♦ In Turkey, Gulenists have burnt their bridges with Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his party, while Mr Erdogan makes no bones about his desire to purge the bureacracy of his former allies. It is, according to one of Turkey’s old secular elite, “like Alien vs Predator.
♦ Edward Luce points out that the Indian politicians expressing outrage over the strip search of diplomat Devyani Khobragade are suffering from a hypocrisy problem: “So far, no Indian leader has expressed a scintilla of concern about the rights of the Indian domestic servant whom Ms Khobragade had allegedly mistreated.”
♦ Ben Bernanke announced the taper, but minimised market discomfort.
♦ David Pilling considers which events shook Asia in 2013.
♦ James Carroll, a former priest, looks back at the first year of a radical pope.
♦ B.R. Myers, an expert on north Korea, explains exactly what happened to Kim Jong Un’s uncle and why Kim doesn’t look smart taking his wife around with him. Read more

♦ Cronyism is being blamed for the slow pace of reform in Ireland.
♦ An AP investigation reveals that a US citizen who went missing on a private business trip to Iran actually had ties to the CIA and was on an unapproved mission.
♦ Bill Keller at the New York Times mulls over negotiations with Iran: “For the moment, our hard-liners pose a greater problem than Iran’s.”
♦ Egyptians are outraged that General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi was not Time’s person of the yearRead more

♦ The Volcker rule is contentious, but it is not the knockout blow some people had expected.
♦ The economically sensible wing of the US Republican party doesn’t exist, says Paul Krugman.
♦ Iran and Israel have paid tribute to Mandela, while choosing to remain a safe distance from the memorial.
♦ Marc Lynch explains why nobody in the Middle East deserves to be on the Foreign Policy Leading Global Thinker list this year.
♦ After cracking down on the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt’s interior ministry has turned its attention to the activist community of journalists, non-Islamists and students.
♦ The Australian speaks to a mother in Iraq who is waiting for her son’s execution to be announced after a “hanging day”. Read more

♦ The success of the Aam Aadmi (Common Man) party at India’s recent state elections is a sign that voters are determined to reshape the political order.
♦ Oligarchs hold the key to Viktor Yanukovich‘s grip on power in Ukraine.
♦ The west is losing faith in its own future, says the FT’s Gideon Rachman.
♦ American and British spies have infiltrated the fantasy worlds of World of Warcraft and Second Life to conduct surveillance, fearing that terrorist or criminal networks could use the games to communicate secretly. Read more

♦ An FT investigation has uncovered the key role played by Deutsche Bank, JPMorgan and UniCredit in the reform of the Vatican bank, by refusing to provide financial services over the past two years.
♦ The World Trade Organisation’s 159 members managed to agree on something for the first time in its 18-year history last week – a sign that the organisation is “coming alive”.
♦ Yingluck Shinawatra’s position as Thai prime minister is in jeopardy because of opposition hatred for her brother – a force that has defined her premiership and driven instability.
♦ Bedouin gangs in the Sinai have discovered that taking hostages is more profitable than human smuggling.
♦ Bill de Blasio’s challenge as New York mayor will be to negotiate and pay for a way out of the impasse between the administration and the unions of city workers. Read more

Nelson Mandela a few days after being released from jail in 1990 (TREVOR SAMSON/AFP/Getty Images)

As the world mourns for Nelson Mandela, tributes have poured in from the many people around the world who encountered South Africa’s beloved anti-apartheid hero. Here are some personal encounters and memories of South Africa’s first black president. Read more

♦ South Africa began a period of mourning for Nelson Mandela, the country’s first black president, as the world joined the grieving for the beloved anti-apartheid hero. FT news editor Alec Russell looked at the meaning of the Madiba magic.
♦ When the US Congress wanted to oppose the South African regime with the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act, Dick Cheney was among the Republicans who voted against it. He has said he doesn’t regret it: “The ANC was then viewed as a terrorist organisation… I don’t have any problems at all with the vote I cast 20 years ago.”
♦ Chinese citizens mourned Nelson Mandela, but also took to the Internet to ask awkward questions about their own human rights leaders.
♦ If the US Congress succeeds in striking a US budget deal in the coming days, it will cement Paul Ryan’s role as chief economic policy maker for the Republican party.
♦ General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, the defence minister who led the coup against Mohammed Morsi in Egypt, has won the Time reader poll for person of the year – beating Miley Cyrus. Read more

♦ Indian women are showing a new confidence and combativeness – a sign of India’s first genuinely popular feminist awakening.
♦ World Child Cancer helps bring birthday hopes to a young girl with cancer in Ghana – the FT’s Xan Rice tells her story and looks at how the work of the organisation.
♦ Count Anton-Wolfgang von Faber-Castell explains how his mid-size family firm, which makes wooden pencils, stays globally competitive against threats from sophisticated Chinese competitors, the stagnant euro zone economy and shifts in technology.
♦ Independent news website Mada Masr looks back at the life of dissident Egyptian poet Ahmad Fouad Negm who died yesterday: ” He seemed to never stop loving life and hating dictators and making jokes through the darkest of conditions.” Read more