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If Republican leaders were looking for a more palatable Donald Trump, on Wednesday they got it.

In his long-awaited speech attacking Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Republican nominee mostly stuck to a prepared speech in which he lambasted Clinton as a “corrupt” politician and “world class liar” who had “spread death, destruction and terrorism everywhere she touched”. He also criticised his Democratic rival for taking money from regimes that repress women and gays. Read more

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He had survived a dust-up with a Breitbart News reporter, a scuffle with a Trump protester, and reports of infighting between him and nearly everyone else on the Trump campaign. But on Monday, Corey Lewandowski was finally dismissed from his post as Donald Trump’s campaign manager, not for any new controversies but rather because of an accumulation of old grievances. Read more

Two weeks ago Paul Ryan announced he would be endorsing Donald Trumpas the Republican presidential nominee in an effort to beat Hillary Clinton.Does Ryan now regret that decision? Hard to say.

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When you’re coming off a primary with 20 presidential contenders, it’s sometimes hard to keep track of all the candidates. Luckily, here is a short primer courtesy of Jack Aiello, an Illinois eighth grader.

For his middle school graduation ceremony, Aiello decided to give his graduation speech in the styles of four past and present presidential candidates, plus Barack Obama. The (very) witty speech – which you can watch here – earned Aiello a shout-out from Ted CruzRead more

On Tuesday, the Democratic National Committee announced that its trove of opposition research on Donald Trump had been hacked by alleged Russian government hackers.

Today, Gawker has published a 200-page document which appears to be the DNC’s Trump playbook. Read more

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Barack Obama cancelled his first joint campaign event with Hillary Clinton this week following the Orlando shooting. Yet he lost no time in taking shots at Clinton’s main opponent on Tuesday in the wake of the Florida attack and Donald Trump’s comments about a proposed ban on Muslims entering the country. Read more

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One day after the worst mass shooting in modern US history, American officials both on and off the campaign trail are still struggling to find reason in the event’s aftermath.

On Monday, both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump gave speeches about Sunday’s attack at an Orlando gay club that left 49 people dead and more than 50 people injured – but with very different messages. Read more

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Last night, eight years after her failed 2008 presidential bid, Hillary Clinton declared herself this year’s Democratic presidential nominee and the first woman to claim her party’s nomination.

On Wednesday, she did something almost as momentous: she took the day off. Read more

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If Hillary Clinton were able to handpick an evening to claim the Democratic nomination, she could hardly have picked a better moment than tonight.

With polls soon to close in New Jersey, California, Montana, New Mexico and the Dakotas, Clinton is at long last in spitting distance of the Democratic nomination, an achievement that will make her the first woman in US history to secure her party’s nomination. Read more

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Another day, another Donald Trump scandal.

While winning the Republican primary was meant to herald the beginning of an easier campaigning period for the New York billionaire, today Trump is facing almost as many daily controversies as he was in February. As usual, his biggest obstacle tends to be himself.

For days now, Trump has been trying to defend comments he made last week about the judge presiding over a case against Trump University, a now defunct educational group which purported to teach students how to invest in real estate like Trump. (Gina Chon and I wrote about the history of Trump University and its potential legal ramifications for Trump back in January.) Read more

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Among all of Donald Trump’s punching bags, few top the media, at once Trump’s sworn foe and his greatest ally.

Today, the emphasis was on foe, as Trump faced off against his press corps at Trump Tower in a news conference that was ostensibly about the media’s coverage of a Trump fundraiser for veterans in January, yet ended up being more about Trump’s relationship with the media. Read more

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If you have spent the past decade wondering what has happened to Kenneth Starr, wonder no more. The famous Whitewater independent counsel who spearheaded the investigation of Bill Clinton in the 1990s is back in the limelight, seventeen years after Clinton’s impeachment. Read more

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On Saturday Night Live this past weekend, Kate McKinnon and Larry David – the actors impersonating Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders – waltzed into the sunset to the tune of Tchaikovsky’s the Nutcracker in a gauzy, dry ice-filled dream sequence that sees the rivals cheerily reminisce over the primary’s high and lows, laugh, embrace and even pirouette.

Would that were the case. Read more

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After a fractious Republican primary, Donald Trump and his erstwhile Republican critics appear to be attempting a different approach ahead of the general election: party unity.

On Thursday, Trump travelled to Washington to meet Paul Ryan, the House speaker, and a handful of other Republican officials – an experiment that went basically as well as it possibly could have. Read more

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Thirteen months into his presidential campaign, Bernie Sanders has finally gotten the recognition that a candidate with 19 primary and caucus wins, millions of supporters and over $180m in campaign contribution deserves: a disparaging moniker from Donald Trump. Read more

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“If I get elected president, head out tomorrow and buy a seatbelt because there is going to be so much happening in the first 100 days it’s going to make your head spin,” John Kasich famously told voters in February.

For now, those Kasich, anti-head-spinning seatbelts will have to be put away. On Wednesday at 5pm EST, the Ohio governor announced he was withdrawing from the Republican race, less than 24 hours after Ted Cruz announced he too was ending his campaign – a surprise for his supporters, opponents and the media. Read more

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Some pacts last forever. Others can barely make it through 24 hours.

While Ted Cruz and John Kasich valiantly announced late on Sunday night that they had formed an alliance to stop Donald Trump in Indiana, Oregon and New Mexico, there are already signs that this new partnership may not be working out as planned. Read more

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Fresh off the New York primary, Donald Trump and Ted Cruz are engaging in a war of words… over restrooms.

On Thursday morning Trump was asked on the “Today” show about a recent bill signed by North Carolina’s governor which restricts transgender people to using public bathrooms that correspond to the sex on their birth certificate. Read more

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The biggest political news of the day comes not from the campaign trail but from the US Treasury. After fierce debate in Washington, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew has announced that Alexander Hamilton’s face will remain on the $10 bill, appeasing fans of the award-winning Broadway hip-hop musical Hamilton, while the abolitionist Harriet Tubman will grace the face of the $20. Read more

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Umpteen New York pizza slices, hot dogs and “Victory” ice cream sundaes later, the five remaining presidential candidates are bidding adieu to the Big Apple. And some are more anxious to leave town than others.

While polls don’t close in New York until 9pm today, three of the candidates — Bernie Sanders, Ted Cruz and John Kasich – had all fled town by midday, a telltale sign for how they expect tonight to play out. Read more