Iowa Trump

It was the Trump event vs the everyone-but-Trump event. The 2016 Republican primary race entered uncharted territory, as the billionaire businessman continued to challenge all parts of the GOP establishment, including the Fox News outlet, traditionally courted by candidates as the most watched cable news channel in America, by holding his own event 3 miles away from the party debate in Iowa.

The FT US political team led by Demetri Sevastopulo and Courtney Weaver in Iowa tracked the action from the rival Trump event and Fox gathering, where the rest of the field of Republican candidates tried to stamp their mark on the race without the noise of the man who is usually the biggest voice in the room. The team was joined by US Online News editor Emiliya Mychasuk.

 

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The Republican White House contenders took the stage in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for their fourth presidential debate. There were eight contenders on the stage after Fox Business News, which co-hosted the event with media empire stablemate The Wall Street Journal, determined that Chris Christie, the New Jersey governor, and Mike Huckabee, the former Arkansas governor, did not qualify to participate under their criteria. Marco Rubio built on his momentum, while Jeb Bush did not do much to bolster a wilting campaign, and Donald Trump stood out less than in previous debates as the field narrowed. 

After watching their fortunes nosedive over the past year on the back of Russia’s annexation of Crimea and adventures in eastern Ukraine, Russia’s oligarchs caught a break on Friday night: a free meal on Vladimir Putin. Read more

(MICHAEL GOTTSCHALK/AFP/Getty Images)

Russians plus planes plus duty-free alcohol can be a dangerous mix (Getty)

Over the past year, the Kremlin has launched a relative successful crackdown on Russian alcohol consumption, restricting the hours when booze can be sold, raising prices and finally deciding to classify beer as an alcoholic beverage (rather than a soft drink).

Now, the government is stepping up to solve another, and perhaps bigger, alcohol-related problem: how do you stop airline passengers from becoming belligerently drunk in an enclosed space?

Over the past few weeks, two new videos have emerged confirming what most Moscow jetsetters could have told you already. Russians plus airplanes plus duty-free alcohol can – on occasion – be a horrible combination.

Take, for instance, the case of Vyacheslav Ismailov, a 28-year-old businessman from Podolsk, a sleepy Moscow suburb. Read more