Populism in Austria
Austria came within a whisker of electing a far-right candidate as its head of state this week. As EU leaders breath a collective sigh of relief, World News editor Ben Hall discusses the ramifications of the election with the FT’s Austria correspondent Ralph Atkins and Brussels bureau chief Alex Barker.

Filipinos elect wild card president
The Philippines has taken a radical change of political direction with the election of Rodrigo Duterte as president. Gideon Rachman discusses why outsiders and investors are so taken aback by the development with Avantika Chilkoti and Tony Tassell.

Saudi Arabia’s ambitious reforms
Saudi Arabia’s deputy crown prince Mohammed bin Salman has shaken up expectations about the world’s biggest oil exporter. MbS, as he’s known, plans to wean the kingdom off oil and boost the private sector, slashing unemployment along the way. Ben Hall discusses the kingdom’s ambitious reform plans with Anjli Raval and Simeon Kerr.

Iraq and Syria fall apart
Iraq and Syria are coming apart, divided into warring factions that seem unable to reach an accommodation. Gideon Rachman talks to FT Middle East experts David Gardner and Erika Solomon about fading hopes for peace and what this means for the fight against Isis.

Are we headed for a Trump vs. Clinton general election race?
The latest round of the US presidential election has seen big victories for Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. So is it now all-but-certain that we are looking at a Trump-Clinton contest in November? The FT’s digital comment editor Sebastian Payne puts the question to Gideon Rachman and Washington bureau chief Demetri Sevastopulo​.

Russia’s new nationalism
What are the origins of Eurasianism in Russia and how has it come to occupy a central place in Kremlin thinking today? Charles Clover, FT China correspondent and former Moscow bureau chief discusses his new book, Black Wind, White Snow: The Rise of Russia’s New Nationalism with Gideon Rachman.

Ukraine in turmoil
How bleak is the outlook for Ukraine? The Prime Minister has resigned, the President is implicated in the Panama papers and the Dutch have rejected an EU-Ukraine trade deal. Gideon Rachman puts the question to the FT Ukraine correspondent Roman Olearchyk and the FT’s Eastern Europe Editor, Neil Buckley.

Europe’s controversial refugee plan
The EU this week began expelling migrants from Greece and sending them back to Turkey – a controversial policy that has been criticised as a possible violation of the Geneva Convention and caused rioting in Greek refugee camps. However, there are signs that the influx into Greece is slowing. Can the system work? Peter Spiegel put the question to Alex Barker in Brussels and Stefan Wagstyl in Berlin.

The Isis threat to European security
Last week’s attacks in the Belgian capital have raised fresh questions about the extent of Isis operations in Europe and whether security services and law enforcement agencies are capable of containing the threat. Ben Hall discusses the attacks and their ramifications with Peter Spiegel, the FT’s Brussels bureau chief and Sam Jones. defence and security editor.

Can Brazil’s Rousseff stave off impeachment?
A political crisis is threatening to cut short the presidency of Dilma Rousseff in Brazil. Gideon Rachman is joined by John Paul Rathbone and Samantha Pearson to discuss the Petrobras scandal, the impeachment process and the economic meltdown that have all contributed to the crisis.

Can Angela Merkel survive Europe’s refugee crisis?
Angela Merkel’s Christian Democrats suffered a setback in regional elections last weekend. How wounded is the chancellor and have German politics changed fundamentally under the pressure of the refugee crisis? Gideon Rachman puts the question to Fred Studemann and Stefan Wagstyl.

Can the EU-Turkey deal resolve Europe’s migration crisis?
European leaders have negotiated a deal with Turkey aimed at stemming the flow of refugees into the European Union. But can it work? Gideon Rachman puts the question to Alex Barker, the FT’s European diplomatic editor, and Tony Barber, the FT’s Europe editor.

Is Trump a threat to American democracy?
Donald Trump now looks highly likely to secure the Republican nomination for the US presidency. Gideon Rachman discusses what this means for US democracy and the rest of the world with FT columnists Ed Luce and Martin Wolf.

Russia’s foreign policy resurgence
Russian air power has changed the course of the civil war in Syria and its annexation of Crimea remains largely unchallenged. Gideon Rachman talks to Neil Buckley, FT East Europe editor, and Sam Jones, defence and security editor, about Russia’s renewed confidence on the global stage and whether this is justified.

Antonin Scalia’s legacy and the US Supreme Court
How influential was Antonin Scalia as the longest serving Justice on the US Supreme Court? Martin Sandbu discusses his legacy and the political repercussions of his demise with FT Washington correspondents Barney Jopson and Geoff Dyer.

What happens if Aleppo falls?
Syrian government forces backed by Russian air power are on the brink of encircling the northern city of Aleppo, a stronghold of the moderate rebels in what could prove to be a decisive moment in Syria’s murderous civil war. Ben Hall discusses the implications with Erika Solomon, FT Middle East correspondent, and Geoff Dyer, FT US diplomatic correspondent.

Britain’s referendum on the EU
David Cameron, Britain’s prime minister, announced the details of Britain’s draft deal to renegotiate its relationship with the EU – but where does that leave the debate? Gideon Rachman discusses with George Parker, UK political editor and Alex Barker, Brussels Correspondent

Iowa offers first test for US presidential hopefuls
After months of build-up, the Iowa caucus will offers US presidential candidates their first chance to get ahead. Gideon Rachman reviews the chances of the Republican and Democratic rivals with Courtney Weaver and Edward Luce.

Lifting of sanctions offers hope to Iran’s ailing economy
The lifting of UN sanctions on Iran reconnects a potentially vibrant emerging economy to world markets, with the allure of a bonanza for international and local investors and a brighter future for a restive young population. The FT’s Siona Jenkins asks Najmeh Bozorgmehr, Tehran correspondent, Martin Arnold, banking editor, and Anjli Raval, oil correspondent, what obstacles remain and how soon the country is likely to see results.

Brussels launches probe into rule of law in Poland
Poland’s conservative government has taken decisions about the courts and media that are causing concern across Europe, prompting the European Commission to launched an investigation into the rule of law in Poland. Gideon Rachman discusses the unprecedented move with Henry Foy, FT correspondent in Warsaw, and Neil Buckley, East Europe editor.