• July 2015 will go down in history as a continuation of hell for Greece, whose leftwing government has brought catastrophe to the nation, argues Tony Barber
  • The beginning of the end for Yanis Varoufakis, Greece’s finance minister who has just stepped down, began not in Athens, or even Brussels or Berlin, but in the small Baltic capital of Riga
  • Though Ivory Coast has staged a successful comeback since its civil war, some say the focus on the economy at the expense of reconciliation could come back to haunt the country
  • Mexico’s government wants to tame the disruptive teachers’ union which has seized public plazas, burned government buildings and choked off a city’s gas supply (Washington Post)
  • “Germany has never repaid”: In a forceful interview, French economist Thomas Piketty calls for a major conference on debt (Medium, orginally published by Die Zeit)

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  • Angela Merkel is taking her revenge on Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras by insisting there can be no more talks on the country’s debt crisis until after its referendum on the bailout on Sunday
  • After China’s main stock index fell by 5 per cent yesterday, investors are blaming the share collapse on the securities regulator and the shadowy world of margin lending
  • An Egyptian soap opera set in a neighbourhood in old Cairo circa 1948 offers an empthatic portrayal of the Jewish community – and casts Islamists as the bad guys
  • Yes? No? Greek Voters Are Perplexed by a Momentous Referendum (New York Times)
  • In Ramadi, the Islamic State settles in, fixing roads and restoring electricity (Washington Post)

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Terror attacks hit Tunisia’s economy
Last week saw the second deadly attack on Western tourists in Tunisia in four months, dealing a severe blow to the industry that is the country’s economic mainstay. Siona Jenkins is joined by Erika Soloman and Roula Khalaf to discuss what the government can do to tackle the jihadi threat.

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Nato renews its commitment to collective defence
Defence ministers from the Atlantic Alliance’s 28 members are meeting in Brussels to discuss the reinvigoration of the alliance in the face of Russian aggression. The US is to make the biggest reinforcement of its forces in eastern Europe since the fall of the Soviet Union. Ben Hall discusses the development with Geoff Dyer and Sam Jones.

  • Japan’s golden era of karaoke may have passed, but the companies supplying technology for the pastime are pinning their hopes on a new market: the silver economy
  • International hotel groups are eyeing Iran’s tourism potential as a nuclear deal that could end economic sanctions nears
  • Marco Rubio is rattling assumptions and could upend 2016′s US presidential election, writes Edwards Luce
  • Can South Africa’s first female public prosecutor save the country from itself? (New York Times)
  • The Dominican Republic’s tortured relationship with its Haitian minority (Foreign Policy)

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What happens if Greece defaults?
Is Greece about to default on its debts and if so, what happens next? Gideon Rachman and his guests Tony Barber and Martin Sandbu discuss what has gone wrong between Greece and its eurozone creditors and whether the political rifts can be repaired.

  • Greece cannot lose by rejecting this week’s final offer from international creditors – and leaving the eurozone would achieve a better outcome for its economy, argues Wolfgang Münchau
  • Foreign companies are finding ways of circumventing economic sanctions on Russia, enabling the provision of goods and services like banking to blacklisted entities
  • As the government in Athens fast runs out of money – and nervous depositors pull cash from the country’s banks – there is growing talk of the extraordinary use of capital controls in Greece
  • A documentary shows how the poorly-trained and equipped Kurdish peshmerga forces are the international coalition’s only reliable boots on the ground in northern Iraq (Vice Media)
  • A Chinese entrepreneur who took just 19 days to build a 57-storey tower says he has triggered a construction revolution. And his dreams soar far, far higher (BBC)

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Turkey’s dramatic change of direction
Turkey’s dramatic election results have set back the political ambitions and increasingly personalised rule of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Gideon Rachman discusses what this means for the country’s future with Daniel Dombey and David Gardner.

By Richard McGregor in Washington

In the confrontational atmosphere pitting Beijing against Washington and its allies in Asia, it is often forgotten that China and much of the west were allies in the region’s defining wartime struggle, fighting their then mutual foe, Japan.

In September, Beijing is planning a massive military parade to remind the west and the rest of the world of that moment, the 70th anniversary of Japan’s surrender in the Pacific War. As commemorations go, it promises to be an awkward occasion. Read more

Will Italy’s regional poll results weaken Renzi’s reforms?
The government of Matteo Renzi has done badly in regional elections. Gideon Rachman and guests discuss whether his reformist project is now in trouble and what that would mean for the rest of Europe.

A view of the ancient city of Palmyra Getty

By Sam al-Refaie

Palmyra: the pearl of the desert. Every Syrian citizen has mixed feelings about this city. It is a symbol of the Syrians’ historic strength and of their queen, Zenobia, who rebelled against the Roman Empire. But it is also the city that held the dreadful prison in which the Assads, father and son, detained all of those suspected of having political opinions that didn’t suit their regime. Read more

Narendra Modi’s first year in office
Narendra Modi’s election a year ago was accompanied by hopes for economic regeneration but anxiety about his Hindu nationalist agenda. Gideon Rachman discusses the Indian prime minister’s first year in office with Victor Mallet and James Lamont.

  © Getty Images

Have the US and its allies in Asia reached a tipping point in their relations with China? The question posed by US China scholar, David Lampton, in a speech in Shanghai in March looks disturbingly prescient after a whirl of diplomatic and security offensives in recent weeks in the region.

The US and Japan substantially upgraded their defence alliance in a high profile summit meeting in Washington earlier this month. Japan, in turn, held its first naval exercises with Vietnam and the Philippines in the South China Sea. This week, the US announced (and then later denied) it would station B-1 bombers in northern Australia, also with an eye on balancing China in the region.

Then, just in time for John Kerry’s weekend visit to Beijing, the Pentagon made it known it was contemplating limited military options in the form of naval patrols and surveillance flights in contested areas in the South China Sea to reinforce its opposition to Chinese actions. Read more

Will Britain stay in the European Union?
Britain’s first majority Conservative government for 18 years is pushing for a renegotiation of its relationship with the EU and has promised an in-out referendum on membership by the end of 2017. Ben Hall discusses Britain’s place in the EU with George Parker and Alex Barker.

Greece on the brink
Greece is said to be about to run out of money and yet there’s no sign of a deal with its creditors. Gideon Rachman is joined by Martin Sandbu and Kerin Hope to discuss whether a further crisis can be avoided.

Obama seeks to cement Japan ties
Siona Jenkins, Gideon Rachman and Lindsay Whipp discuss the Japanese prime minister’s visit to Washington as the US seeks to cement defence and trade ties with Japan, a key ally in its bid to push back against growing Chinese influence in Asia.

By Richard McGregor

Shinzo Abe’s visit to the US this week is by any measure a significant moment. Japan’s prime minister will with President Barack Obama consecrate revised guidelines for the US-Japan security treaty, described by one close observer of Japan as the longest surviving alliance between great powers “since the 1648 Peace of Westphalia”.

The pair will also oversee the final negotiations of one of the largest trade pacts in two decades that will bring together 12 Asia-Pacific countries. Finally, Mr Abe will become the first Japanese leader to address a joint session of Congress.

In a week of landmarks, then, it may be surprising that much of the focus ahead of Mr Abe’s visit is whether he will “apologise” for Japan’s role in the second world war, which ended in Tokyo’s crushing defeat nearly 70 years ago. Read more

Europe’s Mediterranean migrant crisis
EU leaders are scrambling to respond to the deaths of thousands of refugees who have drowned trying to cross the Mediterranean from Libya towards a better life in Europe. Ben Hall is joined by Peter Spiegel and Borzou Daragahi to discuss Europe’s migrant crisis.

  • Despite being accused of naivety in his foreign policy, Barack Obama is showing qualities associated with Henry Kissinger – the arch-realist of US diplomacy, writes Ed Luce
  • Whether by design or accident, Athen’s Syriza-led government has achieved deep European harmony – but this has not produced agreement on a strategy for dealing with the Greek crisis
  • Dubai is hoping to be a bridgehead for deals with Iran as international investors prepare for a gold rush with the prospect of an end to nuclear sanctions in sight
  • Secret files from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isis) show how former officials under Saddam Hussein helped design a blueprint for the militant jihadi group’s meteoric rise (Spiegel Online)
  • Who or what abdicated power in Grimsby, once the largest fishing port in the world and now a target for the UK Independence party, leaving swathes of it to rot? (London Review of Books)

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