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  • If Russia gets away with its incursion into Ukraine, other governments may decide defying America is getting less risky, writes Gideon Rachman.
  • Play at being president-for-a-day to get under the skin of South America’s leaders as regional problems expose a lack of unity.
  • London has impressed itself upon the world as an imperial metropole, a financial hub, a destination for migrants – and now as a subject of moral panic.
  • The father of the boy responsible for the Sandy Hook killings in the US searches for answers.
  • Development experts stand accused of empowering dictators and trapping millions in poverty.

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  • Ten years ago Christine Spolar, FT investigations editor, reported on the Iraq war. She returned last month to find old colleagues and friends living in fear.
  • China’s leaders love watching House of Cards because it confirms their perceptions of the workings of US government.
  • Japan’s yakuza have seen their numbers decline for the first time in years: is it because of a police crackdown, or are they going underground?
  • Francis Fukuyama looks at how effectively the US translates its economic power into foreign and security policies.
  • Tatar leaders war of jihadi-style violence against Russia over its Crimea occupation.
  • Lawrence Summers says the west should make modest promises to Ukraine and then strive to deliver more than it expects.

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  • Having persuaded the world that it now faces a terrorist threat, Beijing may discover find that “Wars on terror” are hard to win, says the FT’s David Pilling.
  • China’s rubber-stamp parliament meeting started off with war being waged on pollution and the war of words with Japan getting uglier.
  • Evan Osnos at the New Yorker looks at the dangers in China’s ethnic divide: “an emerging argument in Chinese policy and scholarly circles has come to see the failure of the Soviet Union as a failure to manage ethnic unrest.”
  • In Ukraine, eastern cities are bridling at Kiev’s interim rulers while in Crimea pro-Russian militias are filling the power vacuum.
  • Time reports on an unusual example of interfaith cooperation in Egypt – weekly exorcisms where Muslims and Christians are briefly united in a fight against demons.

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The international crisis over
Russian troops are in effective control of many parts of the Ukrainian region of Crimea and the United States is threatening Russia with isolation if it doesn’t back down. In this week’s podcast, Gideon Rachman is joined by Neil Buckley, East Europe editor and chief US commentator Edward Luce to discuss how this dangerous situation is likely to develop.

  • Ivan Krastev in Foreign Affairs looks at why Putin threw caution to the wind: “to bring about a constitutional crisis that will remake Ukraine into a confederate state with a very weak centre”.
  • Neil Buckley critiques Putin’s classic performance as he broke his silence on Ukraine.
  • Money flows from power in China: the richest members of China’s parliament saw their average wealth increase more than four times over the past eight years, compared with an increase of under three times for the 1,000 wealthiest people identified in the country. Those who wanted to leave the country however, were less lucky – a group of wealthy Chinese are threatening to sue over Ottawa’s abrupt cancellation of its Immigrant Investor Scheme.
  • “Mandarinisation” is making people in Hong Kong indignant.
  • As the European Central Bank prepares to conduct stress tests and asset quality reviews of hundreds of banks across the eurozone, there is particular worry among some European regulators about Italy’s banks.

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Crimea and a cash shortage take centre stage in Ukraine
Viktor Yanukovich has fled the scene of last week’s brutal crackdown on protests, but Ukraine still faces real danger from separatist tensions that could spiral into violence and the threat of financial meltdown. Ben Hall is joined over the phone by Neil Buckley, Eastern Europe editor, in Kiev, and Kathrin Hille, Moscow bureau chief, to discuss Russia’s sabre-rattling, pro-Russian sentiment in Crimea and whether western capitals can come up with a financial lifeline for Ukraine.

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Can Renzi break Italian deadlock?
In Italy, the government of Enrico Letta has fallen and the country is set to have its youngest Prime Minister ever. Matteo Renzi promises to be a radical reformer. In this week’s podcast Guy Dinmore, Rachel Sanderson and Ferdinando Giugliano join Gideon Rachman to discuss whether Mr Renzi can break the political and economic deadlock that seems to be paralysing the country and what the stakes are for Europe