The economic challenges and changes facing the young “ice age generation” in Japan, and the “post-1990″ generation of Chinese youth.

The US and China: Prospects of the world’s largest economies

The eurozone has dominated headlines for months, but what of the other key poles of the world economy, China and the United States? Growth has been slowing in China for months, and the US is also struggling. James Politi in Washington and Jamil Anderlini in Beijing join Gideon Rachman to discuss the prospects of the world’s two largest economies.


Egypt’s revolution rolled back?

With the announcement of the winner of Egypt’s presidential election delayed, and the ruling military’s move to dissolve the democratically-elected parliament, David Gardner, international affairs editor, and Borzou Daragahi in Cairo join Gideon Rachman to discuss whether the gains of the Egyptian revolution area being rolled back.

Daniel Garrahan reports from Athens on whether Sunday’s poll will produce a leader that can keep the country in the euro.

Another tumultuous week for the eurozone

Spain reluctantly accepted a bailout for its struggling banks last weekend but it has not restored market confidence – the government’s borrowing costs have soared to their highest level since the birth of the euro. Meanwhile Greece is holding a general election this weekend. No party is likely to win an overall majority, the country’s exit from the eurozone is a distinct possibility and as much as €500 million is leaving its banks each day. Gideon Rachman is joined by Victor Mallet in Madrid, Kerin Hope in Athens and Chris Giles in the studio to discuss the crisis. Read more

Tony answers a selection of questions about Greece’s upcoming rerun election that were submitted by our readers on Facebook, Twitter and Google+.  Read more

Putin’s agenda for Russia

As Vladimir Putin settles back into the Kremlin, we focus on his vision for Russia‘s domestic politics and its relationship with China and the west. Charles Clover, Moscow bureau chief, and Neil Buckley, eastern Europe editor, join Gideon Rachman to discuss.

In our Reporting Back series, we ask FT foreign correspondents to tell us about a recent trip.

Courtney Weaver, a correspondent for the FT in Moscow, visited Azerbaijan ahead of the Eurovision song contest – the final of which is being held in the country’s capital, Baku, on Saturday.

Why now? The fact that Azerbaijan is hosting Eurovision this year has shone a light on the Caspian country of 9 million people – and in particular, its human rights record. The event itself is typically a festival of kitsch in which contestants from 41 European countries, clad in sequins and tights, sing their hearts out for their nation. Azerbaijan has embraced the contest as a chance to shape the West’s opinion of the country and what defines it. Read more

By Tony Barber, Europe Editor

Greece, teetering on the precipice of the eurozone, is to hold a parliamentary election on June 17. This will be its second such vote in 43 days. A depressing insight into the country’s political paralysis was provided by transcripts of discussions that President Karolos Papoulias, Greece’s head of state, held with party political leaders on May 13 in an attempt to resolve the impasse.

These transcripts (made public by the president’s office) would make you roar with laughter – if you weren’t weeping in despair at the petty-mindedness, stupidity and shamelessness of some of Greece’s politicians. Read more

Anders Behring Breivik in court, May 21, 2012. REUTERS

By Martin Sandbu

The terror trial against Anders Behring Breivik – now in its sixth week – may have slipped away from the attention of the world press.

But in Norway, there is little respite from proceedings that have now passed the halfway mark. While the court took a two-day recess for the national holiday – ‘Constitution day’ – on May 17, it will now keep working until the trial concludes on June 22. Read more