Brexit

Holding image for blog

UK Prime Minister Theresa May has triggered Article 50, the process informing the EU of the UK’s intention to leave. Unless both sides agree to an extension, the notification will start a two-year period to agree a divorce deal before the bloc’s treaties cease to apply to Britain.

Key points

  • Theresa May tells MPs she has acted “on the democratic will of the British peoples”
  • European Council president Donald Tusk says “this is about damage control”
  • An annotated version of the Article 50 letter is here
  • Click here
    for an explainer on what happens next
  • For the FT’s indepth coverage visit our Brexit page

 

By Gideon Rachman

For the most ardent supporters of Brexit, the election of Donald Trump was a mixture of vindication and salvation. The president of the US, no less, thinks it is a great idea for Britain to leave the EU. Even better, he seems to offer an exciting escape route. The UK can leap off the rotting raft of the EU and on to the gleaming battleship HMS Anglosphere.

Trade, Trump and Brexit

This week, UK prime minister Theresa May laid out her plans for a ‘hard’ Brexit, as US president-elect Donald Trump expressed doubts about the EU’s future and promised a ‘quick’ US-UK trade deal. How feasible would such a deal be? And is the west retreating from a free trade model that has taken decades to roll out? Daniel Dombey, the FT’s Brexit editor, discusses with Brussels bureau chief Alex Barker and FT world trade editor Shawn Donnan.

How will the events of 2016 play out in the coming year?

Daniel Dombey asks Gideon Rachman, the FT’s chief foreign affairs columnist, and Fred Studemann, features editor, how the big events of 2016 – Brexit, the US election, and Syria – will play out on the world stage in the coming year.

By Gideon Rachman

So which is it to be: “hard” or “soft” Brexit? Maybe neither. There is a third possibility that is little discussed but increasingly likely: “train-crash Brexit”. In this version of events, the UK and the EU fail to agree a negotiated divorce. Instead, Britain simply crashes out of the EU — with chaotic consequences for trade and diplomatic relations.

The EU’s trade conundrum

Wallonia, a Belgian region, has rejected the proposed Ceta trade deal with Canada, all but torpedoing the agreement for good. What does this mean for the EU’s trade liberalisation agenda, transatlantic trade and the UK’s Brexit negotiations? The FT’s world news editor Ben Hall speaks with Brussels bureau chief Alex Barker and our diplomatic correspondent, Arthur Beesley.

By Gideon Rachman

Theresa May has one great advantage as a politician. She looks serious and responsible. But appearances can be deceptive. If you examine how the UK prime minister is handling Brexit, a different sort of politician emerges.

By Gideon Rachman

At the Democratic convention last week, I experienced an uncomfortable feeling of déjà vu. Emblazoned across the arena was the rallying cry of the Hillary Clinton campaign — “Stronger Together”. It was a depressing reminder of “Stronger In,” the slogan of the losing Remain campaign in Britain’s referendum on EU membership.

Broken-hearted by Brexit, thousands of Britons are applying, or thinking of applying, for citizenship in another EU country. All I can say is, unless you have recently won the BBC television quiz shows Mastermind or University Challenge, forget Denmark.

According to Inger Støjberg, Denmark’s integration minister, more than two-thirds of the first batch of foreign applicants who took a new Danish citizenship test in June have failed the exam. Only 31.2 per cent passed, she announced on Tuesday. Take a look at some of the questions, and you will see why most people have flunked the test. Read more

By Gideon Rachman

More than a decade ago, I had a curious conversation with Nigel Farage in a restaurant in Strasbourg. The outgoing leader of the UK Independence party told me that his hobby was leading tours of the battlefields of the first world war. He said he was sure that, if it came to it, Britain could again summon up the martial spirit that saw it through the Great War. Read more

“Now it’s our turn!” So said Geert Wilders (above), leader of the far-right PVV party in the Netherlands, after the UK electorate voted in last week’s referendum to leave the EU.

In practice, there is next to no chance of a Dutch referendum on EU membership — certainly not under Dutch law as it stands. However, to say this is not to underestimate the serious political challenges that lie ahead in the Netherlands. Read more

By Gideon Rachman

All good dramas involve the suspension of disbelief. So it was with Brexit. I went to bed at 4am on Friday depressed that Britain had voted to leave the EU. The following day my gloom only deepened. But then, belatedly, I realised that I have seen this film before. I know how it ends. And it does not end with the UK leaving Europe.