Donald Trump

House Intelligence Committee Hears Testimony From FBI Director James Comey

FBI director James Comey was questioned for more than six hours by the House intelligence committee on the bureau’s investigation into Russia’s attempts to interfere in last year’s US presidential election. He is testified alongside the NSA director, Admiral Michael Rogers.

Mr Comey, who came under fire during the election campaign for his handling of Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton’s email server probe, was also questioned about allegations that the Obama administration wiretapped Trump Tower.

Key Developments

  • The FBI director confirmed the agency is probing Russian meddling into the US election, including any potential links between the Trump campaign and the country’s government.
  • The FBI director said the agency has “no information that supports” tweets from Donald Trump accusing Barack Obama of wiretapping his campaign.
  • The NSA director said he agreed with the angry statement issued last Thursday by GCHQ, Britain’s electronic surveillance agency, in which it slammed the notion of its spying on its closest ally as “utterly ridiculous”.
  • In his opening statement, Michael Rogers said that the NSA stood by its earlier report on Russian meddling and its level of confidence in the findings had not changed.
  • In his opening statements, Republican committee chairman Devin Nunes reiterated his previous public statement that he has seen no evidence Trump Tower was wiretapped.
  • The Trump administration maintained its position on the allegation that he was put under surveillance as a candidate
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    US-POLITICS-TRUMP-INAUGURATION-SWEARING IN

    Donald Trump has been sworn in as the 45th US president on Friday in a ceremony in Washington DC where he told the crowds in capital “the time of empty talking is over”. In a typically strident address, he declared: “America will start winning again like never before.”

    Key points

    • Trump delivers a short inaugural address promising to bring back jobs and “our borders”
    • The Obamas left Washington for a break in Palm Springs, California
    • An annotated version of Trump’s speech can be found here

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    By Gideon Rachman

    The questions surrounding Donald Trump’s relationship with Russia are lurid and compelling. But they are distracting from a more important and more dangerous story: the growing signs that the Trump administration is heading for a clash with China — one that could even lead to military conflict.

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    Cuba after Castro

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    Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump Holds Election Night Event In New York City

    Donald Trump became US president-elect after winning one of the most divisive elections in US history, and US markets responded positively after the stunning result had initially hit markets in Europe and Asia, while peaceful protests were sparked in urban centres around America

    Key points

    • Republican Donald Trump surged past the required 270 votes needed to win. Read our coverage of how it happened here.

    • Trump: “Now it’s time for America to bind the wounds of division.”

    • US stock market forges ahead and Asian markets bounce back on Day 2 after an initial sharp sell-off

    • The yield on the 10-year Treasury note jumped by the most in more than three years

    • Mexican President Peña Nieto joins world leaders in taking a conciliatory tone

    • President Barack Obama promises a “smooth transition”

    • Hillary Clinton congratulates her rival and “offers to work with him”

     

    Trump win stuns America’s allies

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    By Gideon Rachman

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    Put simply (but with a massive hedge): probably not. Read more