Islamism

The scenes of chaos during President Jacob Zuma’s speech at the opening of South Africa’s parliament last week will be remembered as one of the darkest days of the post-apartheid era

Visitors from the Chinese mainland to Hong Kong are known as “locusts” and now a long-simmering resentment at their presence in the territory is boiling over into angry protests

Greece must impose capital controls or repeat the costly mistake of Cyprus, where emergency funding from the ECB was spirited out of the country, argues Hans-Werner Sinn

What Isis Really Wants: The Islamic State is no mere collection of psychopaths. Here’s what its beliefs means for its strategy – and how to stop it (The Atlantic)

Washington’s uneasy partnership with Tehran now extends to Yemen (Foreign Policy)  Read more

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  • Greece’s privatisation programme, ordered under the terms of its international bailout, was falling far short of targets even before the country’s new left-wing government vowed to scrap further sales of state assets
  • Following Isis’ brutal execution by immolation of captured Jordanian pilot Muath al-Kasaesbeh, many in the country have called for a deeper military commitment against the jihadist group
  • Foreigners are leaving Russia in unprecedented numbers, reflecting a worsening economic outlook as western sanctions bite
  • The west’s inability to comprehend how Vladimir Putin sees the world means it has trouble thinking constructively about how to deal with him (The American Interest)
  • A convicted al-Qaeda operative has claimed that more than a dozen prominent Saudi figures were donors to the terror group and that a Saudi diplomat discussed with him a plot to shoot down Air Force One (NYT)

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  • Following Syriza’s election triumph in Greece, the coalition that will confront international creditors is an unholy alliance of two parties that couldn’t be further apart
  • The case of a former kebab restaurant owner accused of fraud said to be worth as much as $34bn has rocked Iran amid revelations of widespread corruption
  • Muslims account for more than half of France’s prison population and since the terror attacks in Paris there are calls to prevent jails from serving as recruitment centres for Islamists
  • A write-off of Greece’s debt would cause more problems in Europe than it would solve, strengthening radical parties and breaking down trust between members of the EU, argues Gideon Rachman
  • Saudi Arabia is expanding its regional power in the Middle East as others falter, but its ascendance is the result of the near-collapse of many nearby states (New York Times)

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  • Donetsk’s $1bn airport was supposed to showcase the country’s prosperity. Instead it has become a battleground, with airliners replaced by a relentless stream of rockets that have reduced the glass-fronted terminal to a skeleton of blasted concrete and warped steel
  • Houthi rebels who surrounded the residence of Yemen’s president have reached an agreement with authorities over constitutional change and power-sharing in the country. But who exactly are the Houthi and what do they want?
  • Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s new, $600m presidential palace is not merely symbolic of his move to increase his grip over government – with few constitutional checks and balances, it shows who is really in charge
  • Indonesia and Malaysia have often been put forward as examples of modern and moderate Muslim states, yet in both countries there are signs that tolerance is eroding and a more rigid interpretation of Islamic orthodoxy is taking shape
  • In Yemen, the world’s most dangerous jihadi group is both the government’s enemy and its ally of convenience (Foreign Policy)

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By Gideon Rachman
The “global war on terror” was shot down in a hail of ridicule. Sceptics scoffed that President George W Bush’s GWOT was not global and it was not a war — since terrorism is a tactic, not an enemy. On taking office as US president in 2009, Barack Obama quietly dropped the term.

France has been through a traumatic period following a spate of terror attacks that killed 17 people, which led to a wave of demonstrations by millions of defiant citizens in response. In the latest edition of the FT World Weekly podcast, Gideon Rachman is joined by Hugh Carnegy, a former Paris bureau chief, and Michael Stothard, one of the FT correspondents who covered the aftermath of the attacks, to assess the wider impact of the events and discuss whether France can ward off the forces of polarisation.

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  • Even before yesterday’s shooting, French authorities had warned of a big terrorist attack for months, their concern fuelled by large numbers of French recruits to Islamist groups in the Middle East
  • Having ended a long civil war and presided over an economic boom, Mahinda Rajapaksa expected to coast to a third term as president of Sri Lanka in today’s election. Instead, he faces a resurgent opposition
  • A new antibiotic that could take several decades for bacteria to develop resistance to is being developed through a public-private collaboration, amid repeated warnings about the dangers of growing resistance
  • Charlie Hebdo: its history, humor, and controversies, explained (Vox)
  • 23 Heartbreaking Cartoons From Artists Responding To The Charlie Hebdo Shooting (Buzzfeed)

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  • Following the military coup and counter-revolution, Egypt’s main problem is the restoration of the security state, which is using the judiciary as one of its arms to stifle dissent and ringfence the army’s privileges
  • Russian president Vladimir Putin cancelled construction of a strategically important gas pipeline following opposition from the EU and sanctions, but Moscow will instead develop a gas hub to southern Europe via Turkey
  • Lines of frustrated shoppers have replaced socialist rallies and posters of Hugo Chavez as the most ubiquitous images of Venezuela, with the situation set to worsen after Opec resisted Caracas’s calls to boost the oil price
  • The booming trade in jade in Myanmar – like blood diamonds in Africa – is turning good fortune into misery, as the spoils remain in the hands of the military and Chinese financiers who collude to smuggle the gemstone (NYT)
  • Jihad isn’t all it’s cracked up to be, say disgruntled Isis recruits from France, who complain of iPods not working, being forced to do the dishes – and threats of execution if they attempt to flee (The Independent)

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