“Now it’s our turn!” So said Geert Wilders (above), leader of the far-right PVV party in the Netherlands, after the UK electorate voted in last week’s referendum to leave the EU.

In practice, there is next to no chance of a Dutch referendum on EU membership — certainly not under Dutch law as it stands. However, to say this is not to underestimate the serious political challenges that lie ahead in the Netherlands. Read more

Keep up with the 2016 race by signing up for our daily US politics newsletter here.

Donald Trump delivered what his campaign billed as his “most detailed” economic speech yet on Tuesday, slamming free trade policies and threatening to pull out of Nafta, using the sort of rhetoric that wouldn’t be out of place at a Bernie Sanders rally.

“Globalisation has made the financial elite who donate to politicians very wealthy. But it has left millions of our workers with nothing but poverty and heartache,” he said. He also hammered the Trans-Pacific Partnership as “the greatest danger yet”, and blasted rival Hillary Clinton for previously supporting the deal. Read more

Sign up for our daily US politics newsletter here.

Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren offered up a preview of what a dream ticket for many Democrats might look like with their first joint campaign appearance in Cincinnati, offering up a steady diet of economic populism mixed with enthusiastic takedowns of Donald Trump.

Warren has emerged as the Clinton campaign’s chief attack dog on Trump. And though the left-wing senator has in the past found herself at odds with Clinton – and her husband’s deregulation of Wall Street, in particular – on Monday she did not disappoint, calling Trump a “small insecure money grubber who fights for no one but himself” and a “thin-skinned bully”. My colleague Courtney Weaver has a run-down of the rallyRead more

By Gideon Rachman

All good dramas involve the suspension of disbelief. So it was with Brexit. I went to bed at 4am on Friday depressed that Britain had voted to leave the EU. The following day my gloom only deepened. But then, belatedly, I realised that I have seen this film before. I know how it ends. And it does not end with the UK leaving Europe.

Just a few months ago the idea that Britons would vote to leave the EU seemed implausible. But to the shock of the world, that’s what they just did. A short while back the idea of Donald Trump as president seemed equally inconceivable. Does the Brexit vote tell us we should now upgrade the odds of him winning? Read more

“We have a PhD in crises in Latin America. We had 25 crisis in 30 years. We are better managing crises than abundances,” the Inter-American Development Bank’s chief executive Luis Alberto Moreno told your correspondent on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum on Latin America in Medellín. After a commodity boom that placed many into the emerging middle class, he sees a key challenge is to make political actors use those supposed crisis skills to form a “new Latin American citizen” – more educated, more connected, more aspirational and demanding better and more transparent management.

As Venezuelans line up to validate a petition to recall socialist President Nicolás Maduro and call fresh elections, his government had better pay attention to the growing demands of its desperate people. Even China, Venezuela’s main lender, is getting itchy and has been approaching the opposition to safeguard debt payments. Venezuela’s situation has got so out of control that a gunman opened fire at the central bank as he asked for the board members. Meanwhile, emissaries led by former Dominican President Leonel Fernández are trying to lure the president to unify Venezuela’s exchange rates to give oxygen to the ailing economy. Read more

Sign up for our daily US politics newsletter here.

Donald Trump has taken another step to convince Republican donors to back his White House ambitions by extinguishing the $50m in personal loans he has given his campaign over the past year. Wealthy Republicans have stayed on the sidelines for many reasons – but one was concern that the tycoon might use contributions to pay back the debt rather than hiring more staff and building up election campaign operations in key states across the country. Read more

Sign up for our daily US politics newsletter here.

If Republican leaders were looking for a more palatable Donald Trump, on Wednesday they got it.

In his long-awaited speech attacking Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Republican nominee mostly stuck to a prepared speech in which he lambasted Clinton as a “corrupt” politician and “world class liar” who had “spread death, destruction and terrorism everywhere she touched”. He also criticised his Democratic rival for taking money from regimes that repress women and gays. Read more

What next for Modi’s India?
The Indian government announced welcome reforms to attract foreign investors this week. But India-watchers were distracted by the resignation of the much-respected head of the country’s central bank, Raghuram Rajan. Gideon Rachman discusses the future of prime minister Narendra Modi’s reform programme with the FT’s South Asia bureau chief Amy Kazmin and former Mumbai correspondent James Crabtree.

 

With just a day to go before voting, the result of the British referendum on EU membership is anybody’s guess. The most recent FT poll-of-polls has Leave ahead by 45-44 – and there will be further polls released later today. Those hopeful Remainers who thought they had spotted a potentially decisive surge to their side late last week have been disappointed, as some recent polls have seen a swing back to Leave.

Both sides have an extra factor from which they take comfort. The Remain side point to the fact that the bookmakers still predict that Britain will vote to Remain inside the EU – Ladbrokes, my local turf accountants, are offering odds of 3-1 against Brexit. But the pro-Leave camp have a different source of encouragement. They are boosted by the extremely strong pro-Leave sentiment that many MPs are encountering on the doorsteps, as they campaign. One pro-Leave campaigner says that if that sentiment is genuinely reflected at the ballot box, he would not be surprised if his side wins by as much as 57-43. Read more

Sign up for our daily US politics newsletter here.

Donald Trump must be looking forward to his trip to Scotland later this week, where most people will be more focussed on the outcome of the Brexit referendum than the terrible headlines that have plagued the tycoon in recent weeks. After firing his campaign manager Corey Lewandowski on Monday, it emerged later that evening that Hillary Clinton ended May with $41m more in the bank than Mr Trump whose campaign raised a paltry $3.1m in the month. Read more

At a gathering of Indian professionals at the Hong Kong Jockey Club at the weekend, the news that Raghuram Rajan would be returning to the US when his term as head of the Indian central bank expires in September gave rise to dark speculation — and bets — about how far the rupee would sink. The reaction in Mumbai was equally gloomy.

In the event, the rupee barely blinked when trading began on Monday. But the real damage is below the surface. By eschewing the easy short-term fixes in favour of more painful structural reform, Mr Rajan set himself on a collision course with the government of Narendra Modi. Read more

Sign up for our daily US politics newsletter here.

He had survived a dust-up with a Breitbart News reporter, a scuffle with a Trump protester, and reports of infighting between him and nearly everyone else on the Trump campaign. But on Monday, Corey Lewandowski was finally dismissed from his post as Donald Trump’s campaign manager, not for any new controversies but rather because of an accumulation of old grievances. Read more

By Gideon Rachman

I just want the EU referendum to be over now. The horrific killing of Jo Cox, only a week before the vote, will overshadow the result, whatever it is.

Two weeks ago Paul Ryan announced he would be endorsing Donald Trumpas the Republican presidential nominee in an effort to beat Hillary Clinton.Does Ryan now regret that decision? Hard to say.

 Read more

Sign up for our daily US politics newsletter here.

When you’re coming off a primary with 20 presidential contenders, it’s sometimes hard to keep track of all the candidates. Luckily, here is a short primer courtesy of Jack Aiello, an Illinois eighth grader.

For his middle school graduation ceremony, Aiello decided to give his graduation speech in the styles of four past and present presidential candidates, plus Barack Obama. The (very) witty speech – which you can watch here – earned Aiello a shout-out from Ted CruzRead more

On Tuesday, the Democratic National Committee announced that its trove of opposition research on Donald Trump had been hacked by alleged Russian government hackers.

Today, Gawker has published a 200-page document which appears to be the DNC’s Trump playbook. Read more

France in crisis
Beset by strikes and deepening terrorism worries, France is struggling to cope as it hosts a major football championship, the Euro 2016 games. Gideon Rachman discusses the country’s security problems and political strife with World News editor Ben Hall and Anne-Sylvaine Chassany, the FT’s Paris bureau chief.

Sign up for our daily US politics newsletter here.

Barack Obama cancelled his first joint campaign event with Hillary Clinton this week following the Orlando shooting. Yet he lost no time in taking shots at Clinton’s main opponent on Tuesday in the wake of the Florida attack and Donald Trump’s comments about a proposed ban on Muslims entering the country. Read more

Germany and France: Different world outlook

In an indication of the obstacles that may face a renewed push for closer European integration, a poll released on Tuesday pointed to significant differences in world outlook between the peoples of Germany and France, the nations that were once the motor of EU unity.

According to the Pew Research Center’s survey, entitled “Europeans Face the World Divided”, Germans are considerably more confident than the French about their place in the world and the desirability of international co-operation.

Some 62 per cent of Germans think their country plays a more important global role than it did 10 years ago, compared with only 23 per cent of French people. By contrast, 46 per cent of the French think their country plays a lesser role, compared with only 11 per cent of Germans. Read more