By Gideon Rachman
The relative strengths of nationalism and internationalism were tested in France over the weekend. And this time the internationalists came out ahead. In Paris, Laurent Fabius, the foreign minister, was able to bring down his flashy green gavel and announce that almost 200 nations had agreed a climate change deal.

Brazil’s political quagmire
Brazil’s economy is shrinking, President Dilma Rousseff’s popularity is at an all time low and now opposition politicians have begun impeachment proceedings against her. Gideon Rachman asks John Paul Rathbone and Joe Leahy what this means for the country and whether things can get any worse?

By Gideon Rachman
Something is changing in the west’s relationship with Saudi Arabia. You can read it in the newspapers. You can hear it from politicians. And you can see it in shifts in policy.

By Gideon Rachman
When the House of Commons set out to debate military intervention in the Middle East this week, the technical issue at stake was whether the UK should extend its bombing of Isis from Iraq into Syria.


Mario Draghi has announced further measures to stimulate the eurozone economy after the central bank revised downwards its inflation projections. However, the measures seem to have disappointed market participants who were expecting even bolder steps.

Key developments

  • ECB’s inflation projections revised downwards

  • Deposit rate cut to -0.30%

  • QE extended until at least March 2017

  • The size of asset purchase programme remains unchanged

  • Local government bonds added to programme for the first time

  • Markets generally disappointed by lack of more stimulative measures

  • FT correction: Report on the ECB

By Sarah O’Connor and Ferdinando Guigliano

 

There are many moving parts in Brazil’s crisis, all of them deeply entwined, and none of them travelling in the right direction. The economy is suffering its worst recession since the 1930s. Congress is gripped by the so-called Lava Jato probe into Petrobras’s giant corruption scandal – a Senator was arrested last week. And now proceedings have opened to impeach the President, Dilma Rousseff. Can it get any worse? The short answer is: yes.

The proximate reason for Rousseff’s possible impeachment is the charge that her government fiddled the 2014 public accounts – normally a technical issue. But the reason why the proceedings have been launched now is pure politics. Read more

Kurdish Peshmerga forces detain suspected members of Isis on November 16

What should we call the world’s deadliest terrorist group? Should it be Isil, Isis, Islamic state, so-called Islamic State, or Daesh?

Like other news organisations, we at the Financial Times have debated which name to use and whether it matters. Politicians too have grappled with the question. France has settled on Daesh. David Cameron, British prime minister, now recommends the same.

 Read more

What hope for the Paris climate talks?
How much progress is likely at this week’s global talks on combating climate change? Gideon Rachman discusses the prospects for agreement on reducing carbon emissions with Michael Stothard and Martin Sandbu.

How is Mariano Rajoy, Spain’s centre-right prime minister, planning to win re-election when voters elect a new legislature on December 20? Read more

By Gideon Rachman
I have a nightmare vision for the year 2017: President Trump, President Le Pen, President Putin.
Like most nightmares, this one probably won’t come true. But the very fact that Donald Trump and Marine Le Pen are running strongly for the American and French presidencies says something disturbing about the health of liberal democracy in the west. In confusing and scary times, voters seem tempted to turn to “strong” nationalistic leaders — western versions of Russia’s Vladimir Putin.

The latest round of global talks on climate change, dubbed COP21, begins today in Paris. Environmental campaigners want leaders to agree on emissions cuts, with the goal of limiting temperature increases to 2C.

However, prospects of a deal remain uncertain, in part because rich and poorer nations are struggling to agree on how those cuts should be paid for. Developing countries believe that those who have already become wealthy on the back of burning fossil fuels should shoulder most of the financial burden.

Key developments

Read our bluffer’s guide to the talks here.  

The malign side-effects of the Paris terror attacks and Europe’s migrant crisis are still emerging. But something that needs watching is the way in which the two issues are combining to isolate Germany within Europe. In particular, Germany’s vital relationships with its western and eastern EU neighbours – France and Poland – are under severe strain. Both the French and the Germans feel they are facing a national crisis – terrorism for France, migrants for Germany – and that the other side is not showing sufficient “solidarity”. Read more

Can world powers make common cause against Isis?
France has been courting US and Russian support for a war on Isis in the wake of the Paris terror attacks. But while Russia and Turkey, a Nato member, claim to be fighting the same foe, they themselves saw armed combat this week when Turkey shot down a Russian jet on its border with Syria. Mark Vandevelde asks Gideon Rachman and Geoff Dyer whether world powers are capable of making common cause against Isis.

By Gideon Rachman
In the aftermath of the Paris attacks, two pictures sent a powerful message about how international politics are changing. One was of Barack Obama hunched in discussion in a hotel lobby with Vladimir Putin. The frosty body language of their previous meeting at the UN had given way to something more businesslike.

Donald Trump – would not rule out the idea of a database to track Muslims in America

Watching the debate on terrorism from the US this week has been a bizarre experience. The attacks took place in France – but it seems to be the US where the political demands for ever-tougher border controls are taking hold. On November 19th (Thursday), the House of Representatives passed the American Security Against Foreign Enemies Act (SAFE – get it!) which would stop resettlement of Syrian and Iraqi refugees in the US indefinitely. By contrast, President Hollande has just reaffirmed that France will take 30,000 Syrian refugees over the next two years. Read more

Key points

  • Eight arrests and at least two killed, says Paris prosecutor, after French police raid earlier in Saint-Denis, a suburb north of Paris

  • Belgian mastermind of attacks Abdelhamid Abaaoud was the target of the raid but not among those arrested. Bodies yet to be identified

  • Operation “neutralised” a new, heavily-armed terrorist cell, which was ready to strike

  • In the intense firefight during the raid, terrorists fired 5,000 rounds

  • One of the dead is a female suicide bomber, explosion so powerful it collapsed a floor of the apartment

  • Belgian prosecutors have charged two men in connection with the
    Paris attacks

By Mark Odell, Josh Chaffin and John Murray Brown

 

Paris atrocity exposes European security shortcomings
The Paris terror attacks have exposed Europe’s security and intelligence shortcomings and fulfilled officials’ worst fears about blow back from Syria’s bloody civil war. Ben Hall discusses the attacks and their implications with Sam Jones, defence and security editor, and Roula Khalaf, foreign editor.

António Costa, the Socialist leader who toppled the Portuguese government

I have a confession to make. After Portugal’s October 4 parliamentary elections, I wrote that Pedro Passos Coelho, the centre-right prime minister, had broken the mould of eurozone crisis politics. He had shown that it was possible for a European government to carry out difficult economic reforms and win re-election. This misread what was about to happen in Portugal.

Mr Passos Coelho’s ruling coalition came first in the polls. President Anibal Cavaco Silva asked him to reconstitute his government. But no sooner was Mr Passos Coelho back in Lisbon’s São Bento palace – the seat of Portugal’s government – than he was, metaphorically speaking, out again. Read more

Key points

  • The investigation into last week’s attacks spread across borders, with arrests in Germany as it emerged French police are hunting for not one but two surviving attackers.

  • France carries out fresh air strikes on the Syrian city of Raqqa overnight

  • Russia also steps up its air campaign as the Kremlin announces it has doubled the number of aircraft carrying out strikes against Isis in Syria.

  • Russia’s FSB says it has proof the Russian plane that crashed in Egypt last month was brought down by a bomb.

By Josh Noble, Mark Odell, John Murray Brown and Rob Minto

 

By Gideon Rachman
Ever since the late Samuel Huntington predicted that international politics would be dominated by a “clash of civilisations”, his theory, first outlined in 1993, has found some of its keenest adherents among militant Islamists.