Claire Jones

The front page of Wednesday's Bild

When the final whistle put an end to the drubbing, the winning team celebrated with unusual restraint.

Despite an incredible seven of Germany’s 14 shots ending up in the back of the net, there was little gloating at having delivered a stunning 7-1 thrashing to Brazil, tournament favourites, on their home turf.

The players’ wish to express their joy of securing a place in a World Cup final was delayed by pity – a sense that their opponents, and the Brazilians in the crowd, should not be embarrassed further within the dome of the Estádio Mineirão in Belo Horizonte.

That will have won them as many fans as the flair with which they played last night.

Back in Germany, however, the reaction was as euphoric as one would expect when the national team secures a shot at football’s ultimate prize in such emphatic fashion. Read more

Gideon Rachman

Watching the World Cup from Brazil – as I did last week – it was impossible to miss the huge weight of expectations placed on the national team. Half the country – including some toddlers and dogs – seemed to be wearing the yellow jersey of Brazil. Some Brazilians told me that the players would use that pressure to inspire themselves to greater heights. That always seemed doubtful to me. And last night, we saw the opposite happen: the Brazil team crumbled under unbearable pressure and lost by an unthinkable amount. Read more

By Joe Leahy in Belo Horizonte

No sooner had what has already become known in Brazil as “The Massacre” started than the black-humoured jokes about the host team’s demolition by Germany began doing the rounds on the internet. Read more

Exactly 100 days after he was summoned to rescue François Hollande’s floundering presidency, France’s reformist prime minister Manuel Valls can claim to be making some progress – not least by confronting recalcitrant rebels among the president’s own political ranks.

On Tuesday, the government won an important vote in the National Assembly on measures to begin the implementation of Mr Hollande’s pro-business policy turn, facing down sometimes noisy opposition from a group of Socialist party dissidents who regard Mr Valls’s Blairite tendencies with deep suspicion.

Some 30-plus Socialist deputies abstained in the vote, slightly less than the number of rebels who abstained when Mr Valls set out his stall in a confidence vote in April. The government won by 272 votes to 234 against. Read more

  • The Calvert Journal looks inside the world of korobka, the rough-and-ready football played in courtyard cages in Russia.
  • Iraqi antiquities officials are calling for the Obama administration to save Nineveh and other sites around jihadist-occupied Mosul.
  • “I’m not sure if we’ve learned all the lessons about what we did wrong after July 7 – and I am even less sure that other countries have learned from our mistakes” says Dr. H.A. Hellyer, a non-resident fellow at Brookings.
  • Everything is expensive by historical standards. Neil Irwin explains why.

 Read more

By Gideon Rachman
Two national tragedies struck Brazil late last week. In the city of Belo Horizonte, an overpass collapsed, killing two people. The following day, Brazil played Colombia in the quarter final of the World Cup. Brazil won the match – but Neymar, the team’s star and national posterboy, suffered a back injury that will keep him out of the rest of the tournament.

  • Edward Luce examines EU-US drift: “Without US leadership, the transatlantic alliance will not spring back to life.”
  • Philip Stephens argues that London’s Heathrow airport has turned its “manifest failings into a potentially golden asset” by convincing travellers that “the only way to improve the dismal lot of passengers is guarantee Heathrow still higher profits”.
  • David Pilling asks: what is the real point of GDP and can it ever be accurately measured?
  • Smart view: the French government hopes that its package of business reforms will encourage investment – the FT’s Michael Stothard sees whether France’s business community is convinced.
  • The conflict between China and Vietnam in 1979 lasted less than a month, but the legacy of ferocious fighting permeates the sour relations between the two countries even now.

 Read more

Ferdinando Giugliano

Today Germany and France will meet in their World Cup quarter final in Rio de Janeiro, the latest episode in one of Europe’s classic football rivalries. But off the pitch, a different duel is gripping the continent’s political scene: the one between Germany and Italy. Read more

What would an Erdogan presidency mean for Turkey?
Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has announced he will run in the country’s first every directly elected presidential contest next month. Ben Hall is joined by Istanbul correspondent Daniel Dombey and FT columnist David Gardner to discuss how is the turmoil across the border in Syria and Iraq is changing the political dynamics ahead of the election, and whether an Erdogan victory would mean breaking the grip of Turkey’s old elite, or just another step towards authoritarian rule.

It was a fateful moment in Colombia’s long and troubled history of drug-fueled violence. On July 2 1994 Andrés Escobar, captain of the national football team, was shot six times in the chest in the parking lot of a bar in Medellín.

The killing was supposedly retribution for Escobar scoring an own goal days earlier, which hastened the team’s departure from the World Cup in the US. As a historian friend says, there was always a lame excuse to kill someone in Colombia in those days. Read more