Parisians return to work today following Friday’s attacks, which have left at least 129 people dead and many more wounded. A state of emergency remains in place.

France has responded with a series of police raids at home, and stepped up air strikes against Isis in Syria.

Key points

  • François Hollande declares: “France is at war” and tells French parliament he will seek permission to extend state of emergency declared over the weekend for three months

  • Barack Obama, speaking at the G20, again rules out large US troop presence in Syria

  • French jets have launched strikes on the Isis stronghold of Raqqa, Syria

  • Police raids, more than 150, have been carried out across France, Belgium. Many arrests made

  • Three attackers have been positively identified, all French nationals

  • UK prime minister David Cameron vows to build a case for expanding British air strikes into Syria

  • French police hunt for suspect named as Salah Abdeslam, 26, a French national, and brother of one of the dead bombers

  • A minute’s held silence across Europe

By Mark Odell, Henry Sanderson, Josh Noble and John Murray Brown

 

Following the deadliest terrorist atrocity in a western city in more than a decade, security and border controls have been tightened across Europe. France is in a state of emergency, and security forces across the continent are scrambling to track down those involved in the plot, which French president François Hollande described as “an act of war” in a television address.

Key points

  • The French police are looking for a suspect named as Salah Abdeslam, 26, a French national, who is still on the loose
  • Two of the attackers are believed to have been French nationals who lived in Brussels
  • Belgium authorities have arrested at least five people in relation to a car with Belgian number plates found near the scene in Paris
  • A further suspect has been identified as Omar Ismail Mostefai, a 29-year-old Frenchman, known to the authorities. Six of his relatives have been detained by authorities, including a brother who said that he had had no recent contact with Mostefai
  • The attacks were carried out by at least seven gunmen in three co-ordinated teams
  • Isis claimed responsibility for the attacks in a statement on Saturday saying “this is only the beginning of the storm”
  • 132 people were killed and 349 wounded in a series of co-ordinated attacks on Friday night
  • There will be a minute’s silence across Europe tomorrow at 11am
  • For a full round-up of the FT’s coverage as well as the best from the rest of the web see FirstFT

By Emily Cadman and Joseph Cotterill

 

A series of co-ordinated attacks across Paris has left more than 120 people dead with Isis claiming responsibility.

French President François Hollande has declared a state of emergency and deployed the army around Paris in response to one of the deadliest terrorist atrocities in a western city since September 11 2001.

By Mark Odell and Josh Noble

 

When Narendra Modi was elected as India’s prime minister 18 months ago, my Dad cracked open a bottle of champagne at our family home in east London.

It was an odd way to celebrate the arrival of a devout Hindu leader who has an aversion to alcohol. Stranger still was that this was being done by my Dad, who has never lived in India.

Why was he, like hundreds of thousands of other people of Indian origin in the UK — particularly those from the western state of Gujarat, elated about Modi’s victory? And why are 60,000 of them going to pack Wembley Stadium in London on Friday just to see him in the flesh? Read more

Rwanda's capital city, Kigali, at night

Economic statistics for sub-Saharan Africa have been criticised for decades as unreliable, complicating efforts to measure wealth – and poverty.

But help might now be at hand, thanks to a light-bulb moment for three World Bank economists.

Tom Bundervoet; Laban Maiyo and Apurva Sanghi found a close correlation between the intensity of night-time lighting, as viewed from space, and countries’ gross domestic product over the 21 years to 2012 . Read more

Cameron’s message to the European Union
David Cameron has set out his demands for a new relationship with the European Union ahead of a referendum on Britain’s membership. Gideon Rachman discusses how the UK prime minister’s message is being received at home and in the rest of Europe with George Parker and Alex Barker

03

The Republican White House contenders took the stage in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for their fourth presidential debate. There were eight contenders on the stage after Fox Business News, which co-hosted the event with media empire stablemate The Wall Street Journal, determined that Chris Christie, the New Jersey governor, and Mike Huckabee, the former Arkansas governor, did not qualify to participate under their criteria. Marco Rubio built on his momentum, while Jeb Bush did not do much to bolster a wilting campaign, and Donald Trump stood out less than in previous debates as the field narrowed. 

By Gideon Rachman
Nothing can separate us. We are one family”. So said Xi Jinping after becoming the first president of China to shake hands with a president of Taiwan. The meeting between Mr Xi and Ma Ying-jeou was undoubtedly historic.

For anybody who used to visit Myanmar during the darkest days of the military junta, Sunday’s national elections seem little short of miraculous. I remember travelling to Yangon in the early 1990s, when the closest you could get to Aung San Suu Kyi was to drive past the gates of her residence on University Avenue – where the opposition leader was held under house arrest. Almost all the leading activists for her party, the National League for Democracy, were in jail – usually under very harsh conditions.

Myanmar pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi waves at supporters as she visits polling stations at her constituency

Myanmar pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi waves at supporters as she visits polling stations at her constituency  © Reuters

 Read more

UK economy watchers will be greeted with a deluge of data today, as the Bank of England releases its quarterly inflation report and the minutes of its latest monetary policy meeting. It’ll also give us a rate decision (no change expected) and treat us to a Mark Carney press conference.

Economists and investors will be on the hunt for clues about the timing of any rate rise at the BoE. Expectations were given a jolt earlier this week when Fed chair Janet Yellen made bullish noises on US growth. Many now believe a December hike in Foggy Bottom is a real possibility. We’ve outlined here what to look out for.

Sarah O’Connor, Josh Noble and Mark Odell

 

The US climate change divide
As world powers prepare to negotiate a new global accord on greenhouse gas emissions in Paris, one of the big questions is what happens in the US, the world’s second biggest emitter. Ben Hall discusses the issue with Pilita Clark and Demetri Sevastopulo.

By Gideon Rachman
Donald Trump is so fond of the word “winner” that he even applies it to pieces of chicken. Having lunch with the FT a couple of years ago, the mogul-turned-politician pointed his interviewer towards a particularly succulent portion and declared: “That piece looks like a winner.”

A protest in front of the parliament building in Moldova's capital, Chisinau

After President Vladimir Putin’s annexation of Crimea in March 2014, some feverish western politicians and commentators started to detect the Kremlin’s malign hand manipulating every event large and small across Russia’s former Soviet neighbourhood.

They drew particular attention to Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine, whose political classes contain vocal, westernised lobbies that rarely waste a chance to point their US and European interlocutors in an anti-Russian direction.

Yet the reality is not so black and white. Since the Soviet Union’s demise in 1991, it never has been. In important respects, the political, economic and social ills that afflict these states are home-grown. You can blame the Russians for a lot, but not for everything. Read more

Poland’s shift to the right
The election victory of Poland’s Law and Justice party took many by surprise given the successful economic record of the outgoing government. Gideon Rachman discusses why Poles voted for change, and what the result means for the country’s ties with the EU, Russia and Nato, with Tony Barber, Europe editor, and Henry Foy, Warsaw correspondent.

By Gideon Rachman
At the beginning of this year, Angela Merkel had a good claim to be the most successful politician in the world. The German chancellor had won three successive election victories. She was the dominant political figure in Europe and hugely popular at home.

If Vladimir Putin is looking for a way out of his estrangement from the west over the Ukraine crisis, he sometimes has an odd way of showing it.

Two days after Russia’s president met his US counterpart Barack Obama at the UN Security Council last month and called for an international coalition to fight Islamist terrorism, Russia gave the US just one hour’s notice that it would launch air strikes in Syria. It delivered the message via a Russian general who turned up on the doorstep of the US embassy in Baghdad.

Addressing the annual Valdai Club conference on Thursday, Mr Putin reiterated his appeal for co-operation in Syria – but only after running through a typical litany of complaints about US policy and behaviour.

Yet this was a different Mr Putin from the sour figure who, at the same meeting with foreign journalists and academics a year ago, delivered arguably his bitterest anti-US diatribe since his combative “Munich speech” of 2007.

By shifting the military theatre from Ukraine to Syria – however big a gamble Russia’s military intervention there may be – Mr Putin seemed to feel he had seized the initiative. His acid wit and self-assurance were back. Read more

Will Germany’s economy benefit from Chancellor Angela Merkel’s decision to throw open the nation’s doors to enormous numbers of refugees from beyond Europe’s borders? What, if any, is the connection between this decision and the hunger of German business for new workers in a shrinking labour market?

On these questions there is a spectrum of opinions. At one end stands Marine Le Pen, leader of France’s far-right, anti-immigrant National Front. On her party’s website you can find a video and text of a speech she delivered in Marseilles on September 8.

Ms Le Pen said of Ms Merkel’s decision: “Germany is most likely thinking about its ageing population, and it is most likely seeking to lower wages and to continue recruiting slaves by means of massive immigration.”

You don’t have to like Ms Le Pen’s vicious language to appreciate that Germany has a demographic problem. According to David Folkerts-Landau, a Deutsche Bank economist, the German population – the EU’s largest, at close to 83m – is set to decline by 3.5m over the next decade unless net migration into Germany increases significantly. Without such migration, he forecasts that the German labour force will shrink by an even greater 4.5m workers. Read more

By Ravi Mattu

To understand how Justin Trudeau became Canada’s 23rd prime minister, you need to first understand how Stephen Harper lost it.

His achievement in winning a majority government is remarkable. But for all the talk of Mr Trudeau’s image and good looks — one UK newspaper this week asked if he was the “sexiest” politician in the world — his victory in Canada’s elections owed as much to how voters’ viewed the Conservative prime minister he defeated as to a love-in for the new man. Read more

Hillary Clinton Testifies Before House Select Committee On Benghazi Attacks

Hillary Clinton faced her next big challenge in her quest for the 2016 US presidential race with an appearance before a Republican led congressional committee to testify about the 2012 Benghazi attack that left four Americans dead, including US ambassador Christopher Stevens. Barney Jopson followed the action from Washington with Demetri Sevastopulo, DC Bureau Chief and Emiliya Mychasuk, US Online News Editor. A link to the live stream of the hearing is here  

UK rolls out the red carpet for China

President Xi Jinping’s state visit to the UK has featured all the pomp and circumstance the UK can muster. Has it cemented the UK’s place as a prosperous best friend to China in the West or has Britain bowed too deeply to an authoritarian regime? Joshua Chaffin puts the question to Jamil Anderlini and Demetri Sevastopulo.