AKP

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan delivers a speech to his supporters in Istanbul

Live coverage of the aftermath of an attempted military coup in Turkey, where 3000 members of the military and security forces have been arrested and the judiciary has been purged.

Key developments

  • Erdogan demands “head” of suspected coup plotter Gulen from US; White House says it has not received extradition request
  • Gulen tells FT coup may have been orchestrated by Erdogan
  • PM hails Turkey now back in “complete” control of government
  • Nearly 3000 members of the military arrested; 2750 judges purged, senior judges arrested
  • Plotters who fled to Greece will be returned to Turkey – foreign minister
  • Total death count hits 265, with 161 civilians killed and 1440 wounded
  •  

    Erdogan with Major General Hassan al-Roueini in Cairo, 2011 (Getty)

    Two years ago, Egypt was the scene of one of Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s greatest foreign triumphs. Now it is a country that he and much of Turkey look on at with anguish, a reminder that many of Ankara’s ambitions for the Middle East have come crashing to earth.

    Turkey invested heavily in the Egyptian revolution and also in the government of Mohamed Morsi. Mr Erdogan was one of the first international leaders in early 2011 to call on then President Hosni Mubarak to heed the message of the demonstrators clamouring for his exit.

    When, months later, Mr Erdogan visited Cairo, thousands of supporters greeted him at the airport.

    Nor did ties end there. Ankara announced the extension of a $2bn loan to Cairo. Mr Morsi was acclaimed by the congress of Mr Erdogan’s ruling AKP last September. Just a few days ago, the Turkish prime minister discussed his plans to visit the Gaza Strip – which he would almost certainly travel to via Egypt. That trip looks much less likely today.

    In sum, the Egyptian coup may be a devastating blow to Turkey’s vision of a more democratic, more Islamist-leaning Middle East in which Ankara plays a leading role, partly by virtue of philosophical ties with governments in the region, partly because of its own experience in beating back military influence. Read more

    Recep Tayyip Erdogan (Getty)

    The AKP (Justice and Development party) and its charismatic leader, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, have dominated Turkish politics since 2002. Since then, the country’s economy has tripled in size and Turkey has become an ever more influential player in global diplomacy. And yet, as the continuing protests show, many Turks are deeply unhappy with Erdogan and what his critics charge is an increasingly autocratic style of government.

    What is it about Erdogan and his government that so polarises opinion in Turkey?

    Here are the some of the best reads of recent years on Erdogan and the changing dynamics of his government: Read more