Bloomberg

  • Ahmed Rashid argues that Pakistan desperately needs a ground offensive by the army, which aims to retake the territory the state has lost to the Taliban and the elimination of the group’s leadership.
  • Despite blows to his authority, Nigeria’s President Jonathan Goodluck is still the man to beat in the general election next February.
  • A second Chinese army unit has been implicated in online spying and, according to research, used yoga brochures to infiltrate systems.
  • Bloomberg has built a prototype of its data terminal hooked up to the virtual-reality headset Oculus.

 Read more

By Luisa Frey
Deflation is threatening Spain, which just emerged from recession– falling prices result in higher real value of debt, making families’ and businesses’ lives harder.
♦ In China, reforms announced by the Communist party are compared to “small repairs on an old road”.
♦ The New York Times revealed that JPMorgan Chase hired a consulting firm run by the daughter of Wen Jiabao, the former Chinese prime Minister and US authorities are scrutinising these ties as part of a wider bribery investigation.
♦ The New York Times also writes in its blog Sinosphere about a code used by Bloomberg to keep articles away from the eyes of powerful people in China.
♦ Since its independence, almost every political transition in the Central African Republic has come along with violence. The current conflict is no exception with the country risking genocide, writes Peter Bouckaert, emergencies director at Human Rights Watch. Read more

G8 summit There have already been rifts over the issue of armaments in Syria.
♦ While leaders have been at loggerheads, Assad’s regime has been able to take advantage of the lack of US leadership, writes Roula Khalaf.
♦ The decision to send unspecified military support to the rebels will be dangerous, but it is more risky to stay out, says David Gardner: “Leaving Syria to its present devices will create an Afghanistan in the eastern Mediterranean”.
♦ Maureen Dowd thinks that Obama is being “schooled” by the Clintons: “After dithering for two years over what to do about the slaughter in Syria, the president was finally shoved into action by the past and perhaps future occupant of his bedroom.”
Tax avoidance will be another G8 hot topic: Eric Schmidt, the chairman of Google, thinks corporate tax systems need to be simplified. If you want to read more about the debate so far, take a look through our reporting on the Great Tax Race.

♦ Mayor Bloomberg takes on a new cause: making it mandatory for New Yorkers to separate their food scraps for composting.
♦ Food for thought: is marriage in decline because there is less demand for husbands?
♦ China plans to move 250m rural residents – that’s about five times the population of South Korea – into newly constructed towns and cities over the next 12 years. Elsewhere in the world, cities are turning into vast gated communities for the one per cent.
♦ The BBC speaks to Sonali Deraniyagala, who lost everything in the 2004 tsunami.  Read more

♦ There are doubts over how much longer Latin America will benefit from the “commodity supercycle”.
♦ Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, the former Iranian president, has registered for next month’s election, disrupting the Islamic regime’s plans to hand power to a loyal fundamentalist.
♦ Nawaz Sharif has sealed his third term as prime minister of Pakistan. However, the sense of vibrant democracy has been tempered by Taliban attacks. The New York Times bureau chief was also expelled on the day of voting.
♦ Forty years after Watergate, the BBC looks at the legacy of investigative journalism in the UK.
♦ After the news that Bloomberg’s journalists could see more than Bloomberg’s customers would like them to, Quartz takes a look at the culture of omniscience that pervades the organisation and Hilary Sargent (aka ChartGirl) explains how it works in this neat diagram.
On another note… Britain’s approach to Eurovision might need some fine-tuning.  Read more

 Read more

A few recommendations across the web from the FT world desk today: