Donald Trump

Cuba after Castro

Will Fidel Castro’s influence over Cuba outlast his death, and will the Trump presidency reverse the detente with the US begun by Barack Obama? Gideon Rachman puts these questions to John Paul Rathbone, the FT’s Latin America editor, and Geoff Dyer, Washington correspondent.

By Gideon Rachman

People who are worried by the prospect of President Donald Trump are often reminded of the checks and balances in the American system. The US president is not a dictator. He is constrained by the constitution, the courts and the Congress.

Donald Trump and Europe: friend or foe?

Does the election victory of Donald Trump represent an opportunity or a threat to Europe? Gideon Rachman discusses the mixed reaction across the continent with George Parker, the FT’s political editor in London, and diplomatic correspondent Arthur Beesley in Brussels.

By Gideon Rachman

What is going on between Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump? That question hung over the US election. Now that Mr Trump has won the presidency, the question of his relationship with the Russian leader assumes global significance.

The US – and the world – was still reeling the day after the surprise victory of Donald Trump. The Federal Reserve was facing the possibility of a policy shake-up from Mr Trump, who has been critical of the central bank, but markets defied the panic that gripped them the night before, with the Dow climbing to a near all-time closing high.

Hillary Clinton struck a conciliatory note in her concession speech on Wednesday morning: “we owe him an open mind and the chance to lead”. It is likely that she will have won the popular vote by about 1-2 per cent when all the votes in California have been counted. Read more

Trump win stuns America’s allies

Donald Trump’s momentous victory has stunned America’s allies but also delighted populists and strongmen leaders around the world, notably Russia’s Vladimir Putin. Ben Hall discusses the world response with Gideon Rachman and Guy Chazan.

Republican Presidential Nominee Donald Trump Holds Election Night Event In New York City

One of the most divisive presidential contests in US history ended dramatically on Wednesday morning with Donald Trump winning the White House.

Key points

  • Donald Trump surged past the required 270 votes needed to win by 2:33AM EST.

  • Hillary Clinton called Mr Trump to congratulate him on his victory, but did not make an appearance at her campaign event in New York City.

  • Mr Trump addressed supporters at his own campaign event in New York City, with an appeal to unity, saying it is “time for America to bind the wounds of division”.

 

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In just over 24 hours, our long national nightmare will be over.

I kid. It probably won’t be over for a handful of hours after that, when the first returns start trickling in. Or maybe days after that if there’s a recount in any of the many toss-up states or if the losing candidate decides to contest the results.

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Tonight, the Cleveland Indians host the Chicago Cubs for Game 7 of the World Series, which will pit a team that hasn’t won a baseball championship in nearly 70 years against one that hasn’t won one in 108 years. Read more

With only fourteen days until Election Day, it’s only fitting that Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have spent the day shadowing each other in Florida, a state that has decided many a presidential election – perhaps even this one. Read more

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Put simply (but with a massive hedge): probably not. Read more

Hillary Clinton said Donald Trump was so concerned about her health that he sent a car to take her to a dinner they both attended last night. “Actually it was a hearse,” she joked. Trump said that Clinton had accidentally bumped into him and said: “Pardon me.” He politely replied: “Let me talk to you about that after I get into office.” Read more

Republican nominee Donald Trump speaks a

The final US presidential debate was marked by Donald Trump’s refusal to pledge that he would accept the US election result if he loses. In a fierce exchange, Hillary Clinton called her Republican opponent a “puppet” of Russian leader Vladimir Putin. There was everything to fight for: Mrs Clinton led by 7.2 points in the polls ahead of the debate and was on track to get 49.1 per cent of the national vote, based on a two-way race, according to a Real Clear Politics average of recent polls. The FT’s DC bureau delivered the action and reaction, while Patti Waldmeir filmed voters in a Republican stronghold in Wisconsin, and Charles Clover gave the view from Beijing, all curated by US online news editor Emiliya Mychasuk. 

If there is a chance for Donald Trump to turn this race round, tonight is the night.

He will meet Hillary Clinton for the third and final presidential debate in Las Vegas in the midst of perhaps the worst October for any presidential candidate in modern history. Read more

By Gideon Rachman

The assault on the Iraqi city of Mosul that began this week underlines the fact that the next three months will be a perilous period in international politics. Fighting is intensifying in the Middle East. Tensions are rising between Russia and the west. And relations between China and its Asian neighbours are getting edgier. All this is happening while the US is diverted by the Trump-Clinton melodrama and the transition to a new president.

At the end of a disastrous week, Donald Trump is doubling down on the put-downs.

The polls are showing the damage wrought by the video of him talking in lewd terms about groping women, followed by accusations from multiple women who said he had assaulted them. With those tumbling numbers in the background, the billionaire’s response on Friday was to ramp up attacks on his accusers. Read more

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There are exactly four weeks until election day, and with his poll numbers plummeting in the wake of a video that showed him bragging about sexually assaulting women, Donald Trump has found his true enemy: Republicans. Read more

By Gideon Rachman

How did it come to this? The presidential election debates should represent US democracy at its finest. Instead, the second Clinton-Trump debate centred around sordid allegations of sexual assault, threats, lies and mutual contempt.

Candidates Hillary Clinton And Donald Trump Hold Second Presidential Debate At Washington University

The second US presidential debate brought the expected volley of accusations and insults but came to an unexpectedly dignified close in final remarks by Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. The action and reaction is followed here by the FT DC bureau team, led by Barney Jopson and Courtney Weaver, while Anna Nicolaou recorded the mood among supporters at the Trump Tower bar, curated by US online news editor Emiliya Mychasuk. 

Two pieces of espionage dominated the campaign on Friday – and both are likely to provide fodder for Sunday’s second debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

One’s about Russia and the other is about Trump talking, well, dirty. To deal with the not-suitable-for-work one first, the Washington Post has unearthed audio and video that shows Trump bragging “in vulgar terms about kissing, groping and trying to have sex with women”. Read more