Egypt

• The peace deal struck in Geneva means little in Ukraine’s easternmost province where hard core activists are refusing to end their occupation of government buildings.

Russia seeks economic self-reliance. Faced with the threat of more sanctions over Ukraine, Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev says the country must reduce its dependency on imports and strenghthen from within.

• Thousands of government opponents in Egypt have disappeared into secret jails, which critics warn are radicalising a new generation of jihadis.

• David Moyes’s sacking, after just 10 months as Manchester United’s manager, is above all a story of image.

• The American middle class, long the most affluent in the world, has lost that distinction. New York Times analysis shows that across lower-and middle-income tiers, citizens of other advanced countries have won considerably larger salary increases over the last three decades. Read more

♦ In the new cold war, Russia could hit the US where it hurts – in Iran.

Vladimir Putin has confounded three US presidents as they tried to figure him out.

♦ The decision in Egypt to hand the death sentence to 528 Muslim Brotherhood members was widely condemned, but Egyptian TV told a different story.

♦ The US is losing its edge as an employment powerhouse after its labour participation rate fell behind the UK’s.

♦ Russia’s actions in Crimea have sent a chill through its former Soviet neighbours in Central Asia and the Caucasus.

♦ American economist Hyman Minsky is back in vogue as his ideas offer a plausible account of why the 2007-08 financial crisis happened.

♦ A report on how former Tunisian president Zein al-Abidine Ben Ali changed the rules of business underlines the challenges still facing the country. Read more

♦ Many Iranians see basij– the ideologically-driven volunteer forces of the Revolutionary Guards – as stick-wielding thugs, but they show a softer side as they sip cappuccino and discuss art at Café Kerase.

♦ Although demographic and other factors are against the US Republicans, the Grand Old Party is seeing a strange revival.

♦ It’s not a good time for Japan to put its tax rates up, which is why the government is allowing retailers to act like they haven’t.

♦ Much has changed in Sarajevo since the day in 1914 when Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand was shot, providing the spark that lit the flames of the first world war, yet much has remained the same.

♦ The Egyptian army’s gift of land for homes has prompted speculation over a closely guarded secret: the size of the army’s stake in the economy.

♦ A property boom across Germany‘s biggest cities has been dubbed a betongold – literally concrete gold – rush. Read more

♦ As the Ukraine crisis escalates with Russian troops taking hold of Crimea, Barack Obama faces his sternest challenge – or as Edward Luce puts it, his chicken Kiev moment.

♦ Western military experts suspect Russia of plotting its action in Crimea for weeks.

♦ Politico suggests that Russia no longer fears the west , and outlines why.

♦ The New Yorker reports on the strange world of the Muslim Brotherhood court cases in Egypt. Read more

  • Economix does its take on the Transpacific Partnership and free trade.
  • The Archdiocese of Newark doesn’t have enough money to keep a school open, but it does have funds to build a palatial vacation home.
  • Roy Isacowitz criticises Benjamin Netanyahu’s definition of boycott supporters as anti-semites.
  • Delphine Minoui sees in Egypt a current, real-life version of “Rhinoceros,” the 1959 play by Eugène Ionesco.
  • Soviet cuisine is making a comeback.
  • David Gardner on how efforts to pressure the Assad regime in Syria have backfired.
  • The suspension of Nigeria’s central bank governor, Lamido Sanusi, is likely to cost the country dearly.
  • The trial of Wu Guijun, who was accused of disrupting public order during a labour protest in Guangdong, could mark the end of a period of relative tolerance enjoyed by China’s worker movement.

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  • Glenn Greenwald has lunch with the FT and discusses his abrasive manner and new online venture.
  • Rahm Emanuel has reinvented Chicago’s political machine: the FT’s Edward Luce looks at whether he’s now aiming for the White House.
  • A divide has opened up among Britain’s high earners: the über-middle, made up of doctors and London finance workers, emerge as big winners, while millions of “cling-on” professions struggle to sustain a middle class lifestyle.
  • Students from as far afield as Mongolia, Guinea and Namibia are heading to study in northern Cyprus, where universities have become the leading sector of the economy.
  • Nicholas Shaxson talks about his work on tax havens and compares the dominance of the financial sector in London to the resource curse on countries in Africa.
  • Jihadi life is no longer the lap of luxury with the odd battle thrown in.
  • The Egyptian government’s heavy-handed crackdown on opposition is widening the generation gap.
  • A different generation game is being played in Tunisia, where there is a battle to keep young people occupied and away from extremism.

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  • Banks that cheat people pay fines, but people who cheat banks do time: Gary Silverman profiles Carl Cole, who helped turn Bakersfield into one of the home foreclosure capitals of the US.
  • Egypt’s government is letting exiled billionaires and convicted Mubarak cronies buy their way back into the country.
  • The fallow period is over for Russia – after a decade without any top-level women’s figure skaters, it now has more than it can use and one of them, Julia Lipnitskaia, is stealing the show at Sochi.
  • Vegas Tenold recounts his journey to Sochi in a Niva, “an automotive version of the Russian soul”.

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By Toby Luckhurst

  • The USA can no longer rely on Egypt as a bulwark of stability in the Middle East, as jihadists return to the country to fight the military authorities.
  • Oligarchs in eastern Ukraine are abandoning President Yanukovich’s regime.
  • Iranian hardliners blocked the broadcast of a live interview with President Rouhani, exposing the political battle developing in the Islamic Republic.
  • Critics question whether Narendra Modi can do for India what he has done for Gujarat if he wins the upcoming general election.
  • Hugh Roberts in the London Review of Books questions the orthodox view of Hosni Mubarak’s deposition as a revolution.

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By Toby Luckhurst

  • The Sochi Olympics will only temporarily distract from Russia’s increasing economic problems, writes Kathrin Hille.
  • Figure skater Johnny Weir talks about the Russian obsession with skating and their attitudes towards homosexuality.
  • Journalists are arriving in Sochi for the start of the Winter Olympics to find their accommodation is still being built.
  • A New York Times interactive map series on the spread of violence in the Caucasus.
  • Egyptian actress Soheir al-Babli has called for “a man as strong as Hitler” to assert authority over the turbulent country.
  • Dr Hisham A Hellyer salutes the journalists in Egypt who are trying to hold power to account in a country that is increasingly hostile to their work.
  • Fatima Khan is determined to learn the facts behind the death of her son, Dr Abbas Khan, in a Syrian prison.
  • A UN report released on Monday details the abuses children are enduring in the ongoing conflict in Syria.
  • Vanity Fair examines the relationship between Wendi Deng, ex-wife of Rupert Murdoch, and former British Prime Minister Tony Blair.

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