Hillary Clinton

The first presidential debate is firmly in the rearview window and Donald Trump is moving on to bigger and brighter things: specifically attacking the Clintons for allegedly trading campaign and philanthropic donations for political influence. At campaign appearances in Iowa, Wisconsin and New Hampshire, Trump summoned his best Cuba Gooding Jr, urging his supporters to “fol-low the money” when it comes to the Clintons. Read more

Is Donald Trump really as rich as he claims to be? As Democrats step up pressure for the Republican candidate to release his tax returns, the issue is at the centre of renewed speculation.

Hillary Clinton, the Democratic candidate, asked during Monday’s debate whether one reason Mr Trump is resisting the push to release his returns is that they will show he is not as well-off as he has declared. Read more

The first presidential debate tonight may rival the Super Bowl and the moon landing in terms of viewership, and it’s easy to see why.In one corner you have a historically unpopular former first lady, senator and secretary of state and in the other an even more unpopular former reality TV star and real estate mogul who has a history of racist, misogynistic and xenophobic rhetoric. Read more

Views Ahead Of The First Presidential Debate At Hofstra University

The much-awaited showdown between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is the first of the three presidential debates comes as the latest polls show the Republican and Democratic candidates for the White House neck and neck with only 43 days until the November 8 election. Our DC bureau track the action and reaction.
 

Hillary Clinton has no shortage of attack lines to throw at Donald Trump in next Monday’s debate, but if one was going to be “you haven’t even unified your own party” it just became a little less viable. Read more

Hillary Clinton returned to the campaign trail after a bout of pneumonia just in time to see her poll lead over Donald Trump evaporate and the race tighten to a veritable draw.

Today’s NYT/CBS poll is the latest with grim news for Clinton. It shows her leading Donald Trump 46-44 among likely voters, while holding a wider edge among the broader pool of registered voters, up 46 per cent to 41 per cent. Read more

US election 2016: the what ifs

The US presidential election has taken a dramatic new turn with the sudden illness of Hillary Clinton, and a tightening in the opinion polls. Could Donald Trump actually win? Gideon Rachman discusses with the FT’s chief political commentator Philip Stephens and Shawn Donnan, the world trade editor based in the Washington bureau.

 

As we wrap up the week, here is one take-away: ageism is alive and well! At least in the world of campaign politics.For much of the past two weeks, conservative news sites have focused on the status of Hillary Clinton’s health. (Is she prone to seizures? Does she secretly wear a defibrillator?) – conspiracy theories Clinton tried to put to rest on a Monday appearance on the Jimmy Kimmel show.

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You’re a racist! No, you’re a racist! Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton took their bitter battle for the White House deeper into the political trenches on Thursday with duelling speeches in which each accused the other of being racist. Read more

 

Donald Trump will have an unusual special guest on stage tonight when he holds a campaign rally in Jackson, Mississippi: Nigel Farage, the former leader of the UK Independence Party who along with Boris Johnson spearheaded the populist movement in Britain that led to Brexit. Read more

Hillary Clinton was on late-night television on Tuesday having her pulse checked by chat show host Jimmy Kimmel, as well as forcing open a jar of pickles.

The gags on ABC television were a response to mutterings about Clinton’s health by allies of Donald Trump including former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani. Earlier this month Trump himself asserted that Clinton “lacks the mental and physical stamina to take on Isis”. Read more

Do you hear that leaky faucet? That’s the sound of the never-ending Hillary Clinton email saga, which 77 days out from Election Day continues to bring new revelations.

Today, Judicial Watch, the conservative legal group, revealed that Clinton and her lawyers had failed to release almost 15,000 work-related emails to the FBI. The State department now has one month to appraise those emails, after which it and Judicial Watch must set a timeline for them to be released. Read more

Another one bites the dust. Two months after firing his first campaign manager and two days after reshuffling his senior team, Donald Trump revealed on Friday morning that Paul Manafort, his campaign chairman who had been running the whole operation, ​had resigned. But was the departure a resignation? The evidence ​is unclear but ​​suggests otherwise.

Exhibit A: On Wednesday morning, Manafort told me he was “staying” when I asked if the revamp meant he was out. Read more

Donald Trump ended another turbulent week sarcastically. Yesterday we covered the Republican’s out-there statement that Barack Obama was the “founder of Isis”, an unambiguous claim that he repeated multiple times while turning down invitations to retract or revise it. But today he said we shouldn’t have taken it so seriously after all. “They don’t get sarcasm?” he tweeted of CNN (and the rest of us) who covered it.

Aside from Trump’s ability to dominate a day’s news cycle, the episode also highlighted a couple of other things. One is what Newt Gingrich, a steadfast Trump ally, described as the imprecision of his language. “He sometimes uses three words when he needs 10,” Gingrich said, exasperatedly. The other is that Mr Trump is ramping up the time he spends bashing the media. Reporters like myself have been getting emails from the campaign highlighting a daily “media bias offender”. Read more

It’s possible to become inured to Donald Trump’s outlandish statements. Trump perhaps knows that the bar for attention is gradually rising, but he has made a huge splash with his latest effort – a claim that Barack Obama is “the founder of Isis”.

Yes, that’s as barefaced as it came. Trump did not mean to say Obama was an “enabler” of Isis, or that he created the messy environment from which Isis emerged. He meant to say what he said: Obama founded Isis. Read more

Donald Trump spent Wednesday campaigning, traversing from the Southwest Virginia Higher Education Center in Virginia’s Abingdon, to a rally in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, where polls show him locked in a tight race with Hillary Clinton.

Back at his Manhattan headquarters, however, someone was doing a little traversing of their own. For most of Wednesday afternoon, camera crews trained their lenses on a spandex-clad climber who has been scaling Trump Tower using suction cups. The second cupping controversy of the week ended with the man being hauled in through a window by police officers. It was a distraction from the other campaign news of the day, which centered on the fall-out over Trump’s Tuesday comment about Second Amendment supporters stopping Clinton from nominating liberal justices to the Supreme Court. Read more

Donald Trump sought to reset his flailing candidacy with what his campaign billed as a major economic address on Monday in Detroit, with the property developer and former reality TV star promising to slash regulation, cut taxes in a “tax revolution” and revive manufacturing through an “America First” economic policy.

Trump’s aim was to attract Republicans who have been repelled by some of his xenophobic rhetoric and erratic impulses. But an open letter signed by 50 senior Republican national security officials illustrates just how difficult that may be. In it, Republican former heads of the CIA, NSA and homeland security, among others, write, “none of us will ever vote for Donald Trump” because he “lacks the character, values and experience” to be president and “would put at risk our country’s national security and wellbeing”. Read more

244 days. That’s how long it had been since Hillary Clinton gave a press conference. Until today.

This afternoon, the Democratic nominee appeared at the National Association of Black Journalists and National Association of Hispanic Journalists’ Joint Conference and deigned to take a few questions from journalists in the audience. Read more

It is a question often raised by Donald Trump’s seemingly glib or off-the-cuff opinions on minefield subjects that other politicians would avoid: “What does that mean?”

Today it was Barack Obama who was asking it, as he was quizzed at a press conference on Trump’s suggestion that this year’s election could be rigged. “That’s ridiculous. It doesn’t make any sense,” the president said, before mentioning kids who lose playground games and say they were cheated. Read more

By Gideon Rachman

At the Democratic convention last week, I experienced an uncomfortable feeling of déjà vu. Emblazoned across the arena was the rallying cry of the Hillary Clinton campaign — “Stronger Together”. It was a depressing reminder of “Stronger In,” the slogan of the losing Remain campaign in Britain’s referendum on EU membership.