Klaus Schwab

VINCENZO PINTO/AFP/Getty Images

VINCENZO PINTO/AFP/Getty Images

By Esther Bintliff and Claire Jones in London, with contributions from FT writers and editors in Davos.

All times GMT. This post should update automatically every few minutes, but it may take longer on mobile devices.

19.32 NEWS JUST IN. Lifen Zhang, editor-in-chief of FTChinese, writes that World Economic Forum officials are open to moving the date of next year’s event so that it does not clash with Chinese New Year.

The absence of Chinese senior officials – who stayed away from Davos this year due to the forum’s clash with Chinese lunar new year festivities – has been something of an embarrassment for organisers.
Especially this year, when there will be the once-a-decade leadership shuffle in China, it made sense for senior Chinese officials to stay home and celebrate the new year at home, where they can be be seen with the people during the festivities.
Now it appears that the World Economic Forum is open to moving the annual Davos gathering to an earlier date, possibly in mid-January, to ease the way for Chinese leaders to attend.

 Read more >>

REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

By Esther Bintliff and Claire Jones in London, with contributions from FT editors and writers in Davos. All times GMT.

18.49 That’s it for today’s live blog.

The eurozone crisis and income inequality remained the key issues on day 2.

What’s in store for delegates this evening?

For those that still have the stamina to tackle the big issues, there’s a panel on what will emerge as the new European identity in the 21stcentury, and another discussion with no fewer than eight Nobel laureates on the state of the world.

For those looking for a little light relief, Paulo Coelho talks on the art of storytelling.

Join us tomorrow from 07.30 for day 3 of Davos.

18.45 The FT’s banking editor Patrick Jenkins spoke to Jamie Dimon, the straight-talking chief executive of JPMorgan, this afternoon. Mr Dimon revealed that the US bank had considered pulling its operations in the eurozone’s more troubled member states. Here are a selection of the best quotes. Read more >>

FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

Welcome to the FT’s rolling coverage of the World Economic Forum. By Esther Bintliff and Claire Jones in London, with contributions from FT editors and writers in Davos.

18.30 That’s it for day 1 of our Davos rolling blog.

The eurozone crisis dominated proceedings, but Merkel’s speech was a bit of a let-down by most accounts, notably Martin Wolf’s (see post at 17.25).

Income inequality was another talking point – see posts at 13.45  and 15.00 and Gillian Tett’s blog here.

This evening delegates can catch a screening of “The Lady” with director Luc Besson, find out their social network status, or share a nightcap with “the princess of Africa”, singer and president of the Princess of Africa Foundation Yvonne Ntombizodwa Chaka Chaka.

Join us again tomorrow at 07.30 when we’ll bring you more trenchant analysis, quotes (both vacuous and profound), and hats from the slopes of Davos.

18.11 A tip from the FT’s banking editor Patrick Jenkins: if you’re going to Davos never book a hotel in Klosters. Read more >>

Esther Bintliff

Workers clean the stage of the main Congress Hall in Davos on Tuesday. Photo: VINCENZO PINTO/AFP/Getty Images

Workers clean the stage of the main Congress Hall in Davos on Tuesday. Photo: VINCENZO PINTO/AFP/Getty Images

The World Economic Forum kicks off on Wednesday, and the FT will be running a rolling blog to bring you the latest news and views from the Alpine resort-turned-world’s-biggest-talking-shop.

Among the attendees will be some of the world’s most powerful, most wealthy, and most learned men and women. Yet their collective profile could hardly be at a lower ebb. If Davos Man walked, his pinstripe suit would surely be tattered, his bowler hat squashed, his nose a little bloodied. Read more >>