Lonmin

Co-workers and relatives of miners shot at Marikana gather there to mark the first anniversary of their deaths (Getty)

The shooting and killing of 34 striking miners in Marikana a year ago has become a symbol for the growing inequality and civil strife boiling beneath the surface of post-apartheid South Africa.

The massacre at the Marikana platinum mine complex operated by the London-listed company Lonmin occurred six days into a strike in which 10 others had already been killed in clashes, including two policemen. The striking miners, armed with sticks, stones and machetes, were demanding monthly wages of R12,500, a little more than £900, in a country where the average wage is R27,239. Strikers said that they had been warned to leave the area and then were surrounded by coils of razor wire laid down by police. “That’s when they started shooting,” the FT’s Andrew England was told at the time. “It was terrible.” Read more >>

Police surround fallen miners near the Marikana platinum mine on August 16 (AFP/GettyImages)

by Ruona Agbroko

Mining has always been a dangerous business. But the tragedy that unfolded last month in Marikana, South Africa, threw a new and harsh light on the lives of those who spend their days toiling in the dark. On August 16, 34 workers were killed and 78 were wounded when police opened fire during clashes over pay at a platinum mine in Marikana, South Africa. The violence evoked painful memories of state brutality during the apartheid era, and prompted a debate around how much progress the country has made in tackling inequality. As South Africa produces about 80 per cent of the world’s platinum supply, the unrest continues to spook global commodities markets, pushing up platinum prices and dragging gold futures up too. Three weeks after the killings, crisis resolution talks have restarted, but will they succeed? And what will be the long term legacy of Marikana? Read more >>