Nigeria

Abubakar Shekau has been killed and resurrected so many times now he is using up his proverbial nine lives .

The leader of Nigeria’s Boko Haram extremists appeared on Thursday in a fresh video released to the French news agency AFP, declaring the border areas with Cameroon as “Muslim territory” and boasting that only Allah could take his breath away. Read more >>

Gideon Rachman

The political leaders of all 32 nations competing in the World Cup will be praying for a good performance from their national side. With the possible exception of Barack Obama, they can confidently expect to bask in any success achieved on the playing fields of Brazil. Football glory is welcome for any country. But, right now, it feels particularly important for those countries that are currently troubled by national identity crises – in particular Belgium, Nigeria, Spain and even, France. Fortunately, all four countries have good teams that have arrived in Brazil with high hopes. Read more >>

  • Ahmed Rashid argues that Pakistan desperately needs a ground offensive by the army, which aims to retake the territory the state has lost to the Taliban and the elimination of the group’s leadership.
  • Despite blows to his authority, Nigeria’s President Jonathan Goodluck is still the man to beat in the general election next February.
  • A second Chinese army unit has been implicated in online spying and, according to research, used yoga brochures to infiltrate systems.
  • Bloomberg has built a prototype of its data terminal hooked up to the virtual-reality headset Oculus.

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Nigerian teachers at a rally in Lagos protesting against the abduction of 200 schoolgirls and the killing of 173 of their colleagues by the Islamist Boko Haram group. Getty

Osama Bin Laden must be chuckling from his grave on the ocean floor. In the wake of 9/11 he explicitly targeted Nigeria as a new front-line in his global jihad. When the UN Security Council on Thursday blacklisted Boko Haram alongside al-Qaeda and its other affiliates, Nigeria had formally arrived.

It is the latest in a series of international gestures intended to isolate the group, which provoked international outrage for a series of atrocities including abducting more than 200 Nigerian schoolgirls and threatening to sell them into slavery. But its value is little more than symbolic.

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Gideon Rachman

Onlookers at an explosion in Nairobi (Getty)

Join the dots from this week’s news stories and you get a picture of an African continent that is increasingly troubled by Islamist terrorism. On Friday, the British government started evacuating hundreds of tourists from the Kenyan coast, in response to a terrorist threat. Confirming the danger, two bombs went off in Nairobi, killing ten people. Meanwhile in west Africa, the horrifying abduction of hundreds of schoolgirls by Boko Haram remains unresolved – but has highlighted the extent to which large swathes of Africa’s most populous nation are now destabilised by extremist fighters.

One western country that is clearly concerned by a pan-African Islamist threat is France. Over the weekend, the French hosted an international conference – bringing together leaders from African nations, including Cameroon and Nigeria, as well as representatives from the US, UK and EU. Read more >>

  • The languishing economy in northern Nigeria has driven recruitment into the brutal insurgency campaign.
  • Martin Wolf argues that to eliminate excess capacity and raise inflation to 2 per cent, the ECB needs to do “whatever it takes” again or the crisis might yet return.
  • In March, the Fed stated that interest rates may stay abnormally low even when unemployment and inflation are back to normal, but Janet Yellen has given no detailed explanation of why. Several of the possible explanations, says the FT’s Robin Harding, are either so tenuous or so gloomy that it is easy to see why a Fed chair might be reluctant to talk about them.
  • If Ukraine loses its southeast region, it could cut off half the economy and push the debt-to-GDP ratio to a dangerously high level.
  • Author Alaa al-Aswany argues for an Egyptian society when Egyptians who enjoy belly dancing don’t frown upon the women who dance, but appreciate the art form and the value of its performers.

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♦ A potential split from Kiev is dividing the 200,000 miners around Donetsk whose livelihoods depend on Ukraine’s demand for coal.

♦ Anti-Assad rebel Abu Omar’s darkly comedic ‘Blockade Meals’ blog contains tips and recipes to help Syrians survive life under siege.

♦ Syria is the most dangerous place in the world for journalists. More than 60 have been killed there since the current conflict began and many others have been kidnapped as they become pawns in the conflict.

♦ Simon Schama argues that Scotland‘s exit from the ‘splendid mess’of Britain’s multicultural union would be a disaster.

♦ The town of Chibok, deep in the northeastern Nigeria bush and down the most Boko Haram-dense road in the country, is gripped by fear and pain after the terror group kidnapped more than 200 of its daughters. Read more >>

  • Pressure has grown on the Nigerian government to increase its efforts to rescue more than 200 schoolgirls abducted three weeks ago by Boko Haram militants.
  • Thailand’s prime minister has been ousted by judges in a contentious ruling that threatens to plunge southeast Asia’s paralysed economic hub into deeper turmoil.
  • Minecraft has smuggled an educational game past children and is helping to create the next Frank Gehry or Zaha Hadid, says Helen Lewis, deputy editor of the New Statesman.
  • Vladimir Putin is taking on the Russian language: David Remnick muses over how his ban on swearing will work.

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♦ Edward Luce explains why it is stupid to insult the IQ of Tea Party members.
♦ The budget fight that led to the first government shutdown in 17 years set off a public escalation of the battle for control of the Republican Party – a confrontation between Tea Party conservatives and establishment Republicans.
♦ The National Geographic reports on how the presence of Boko Haram has affected public psyche in Nigeria: “Boko Haram has become a kind of national synonym for fear, a repository for Nigerians’ worst anxieties about their society and where it’s headed.”
♦ Susan Faludi, the author of Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women, wonders which women the Lean In community is trying to reach.
Christina Lamb writes about her year with Malala Yousafzai.
♦ Dennis Rodman compares a visit to North Korea with a holiday in Ibiza. Read more >>

♦ Many in Japan are hoping that Shinzo Abe’s pragmatism will win out over his ideology.
♦ Rotimi Amaechi, the governor of Rivers state in Nigeria, has accused President Goodluck Jonathan of condoning “impunity and authoritarianism” in an effort to ensure re-election in 2015.
♦ A generation of Muslim Americans has come of age in the shadow of 9/11, amid a climate that ranges from low-level paranoia to verbal abuse and vandalism. In response, some embrace their faith more fervently, others live in self-imposed isolation.
♦ Western states in the US may break temperature records again this year, but what does this mean for farmers and agriculture?
♦ Israel’s government views the EU plan to label products made in settlements as symptomatic of a greater threat to the legitimacy of the Jewish state.
♦ The Israeli-Palestinian peace process is back and Foreign Policy has a handy guide to the buzzwords that are going to be flying around.
♦ A young conscientious objector has proved tricky for Israel’s army – he would serve if it wasn’t for the Israeli occupation. Read more >>