Recep Tayyip Erdogan

By Catherine Contiguglia
♦ The public mood in Egypt is hardening against Islamists since President Mohamed Morsi was deposed – a result of fatigue with the turmoil caused by Brotherhood marches, and hostile local media that refrain from covering the bloody crackdown on Islamist protest camps.
♦ On the flip side, the crackdown on Islamist camps caused the most violent wave of Islamist violence against Christians in modern history, with attacks on 30 churches and at least four Christian deaths.
♦ In the hours before Egyptian security forces launched a crackdown on camps of pro-Morsi supporters, American diplomats were pushing for agreements between the two groups to avoid violence – all of which failed, as generals in Cairo ignored Americans “in a cold-eyed calculation that they would not pay a significant cost.”
♦ An event that brought together India’s prime minister with past, present and future bosses of the central bank yielded some insight into what the future might hold for the volatile economy, including bringing incoming RBI governor Raghuram Rajan on earlier, not adding new capital controls, and narrowing the trade deficit.
♦ Being an American among Brits sometimes “feels like being a guest who shows up at a memorial service wearing a Hawaiian shirt and traumatizes the mourners with intrusive personal questions,” writes Sarah Lyall of her 18 years as the New York Times’ UK correspondent.
♦ The partner of Glenn Greenwald, the Guardian journalist who revealed surveillance programs by the NSA using documents passed to him by whistleblower Edward Snowden, was detained for almost nine hours by UK authorities in Heathrow airport to be questioned under the Terrorism Act 2000.
♦ After almost 60 years, the US intelligence community has openly acknowledged that it was behind the controversial overthrow of Iran’s former prime minister Mohammed Mossadegh in 1953.
♦ Turkey’s greatest writer Orhan Pamuk converses with Simon Schama about recent developments in his country, including the “wonderful” uprising in Taksim square and the twilight of prime minister Tayyip Erdogan, and allows him to step into his home that has been transformed into a “Museum of Innocence.” Read more

Daniel Dombey

Erdogan with Major General Hassan al-Roueini in Cairo, 2011 (Getty)

Two years ago, Egypt was the scene of one of Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s greatest foreign triumphs. Now it is a country that he and much of Turkey look on at with anguish, a reminder that many of Ankara’s ambitions for the Middle East have come crashing to earth.

Turkey invested heavily in the Egyptian revolution and also in the government of Mohamed Morsi. Mr Erdogan was one of the first international leaders in early 2011 to call on then President Hosni Mubarak to heed the message of the demonstrators clamouring for his exit.

When, months later, Mr Erdogan visited Cairo, thousands of supporters greeted him at the airport.

Nor did ties end there. Ankara announced the extension of a $2bn loan to Cairo. Mr Morsi was acclaimed by the congress of Mr Erdogan’s ruling AKP last September. Just a few days ago, the Turkish prime minister discussed his plans to visit the Gaza Strip – which he would almost certainly travel to via Egypt. That trip looks much less likely today.

In sum, the Egyptian coup may be a devastating blow to Turkey’s vision of a more democratic, more Islamist-leaning Middle East in which Ankara plays a leading role, partly by virtue of philosophical ties with governments in the region, partly because of its own experience in beating back military influence. Read more

By Aranya Jain

♦ Ewen Macaskill describes how and why Edward Snowden revealed himself to the Guardian, starting with emails in February.
♦ Geoff Dyer examines the extent of government surveillance and why we might need a ‘Church committee for the digital age’.
♦ Turkey – The struggle for Taksim continues, and the stand-off is here to stay – any new developments will likely come from within Erdogan’s own party.
♦ A plea for help from Masanjia labour camp in China was hidden in Halloween decorations and found by a woman in Oregon, leading to an exposition of the camp’s brutal system.
♦ The North Pond Hermit of Maine has committed at least 1,000 burglaries over 27 years, while living alone in the woods. Read more

♦ The NSA whistleblower has revealed himself via a video interview with the Guardian – find out more about Edward Snowden elsewhere on this blog.
♦ Edward Luce argues that President Barack Obama has hurt himself and business over the issue of privacy.
♦ In Turkey, members of every sector of society have united against Erdogan, whose intransigence could split his party.
♦ The Washington Post reports on the mourning parents of Newtown.
♦ The Obama administration has begun helping Middle Eastern allies to build up their defences against Iran’s cyberweapons, and will be doing the same in Asia. Read more

♦The US National Security Agency and the FBI are tapping directly into the central servers of nine leading internet companies. Glenn Greenwald, who broke the story for the Guardian, has been focused on government surveillance for years and the article is expected to attract an investigation from the justice department.
♦ Turkey is having its 1969, writes Ben Judah, and now it needs its Charles de Gaulle.
♦ Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s absence in Turkey this week has highlighted the difference in style between him and Abdullah Gul, the president.
♦ Ollie Rehn, the European Commission’s economic chief, has lashed out at the IMF’s criticism of the first Greek bailout, accusing the fund of revisionist history.
♦ What are the choices for Syrian citizens now? They are all grim and make the Geneva talks more urgent than ever, says Charles Glass.
♦ The humanities division at Harvard University is attracting fewer undergraduates amid concerns about the degree’s value in a rapidly changing job market. Read more

Recep Tayyip Erdogan (Getty)

The AKP (Justice and Development party) and its charismatic leader, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, have dominated Turkish politics since 2002. Since then, the country’s economy has tripled in size and Turkey has become an ever more influential player in global diplomacy. And yet, as the continuing protests show, many Turks are deeply unhappy with Erdogan and what his critics charge is an increasingly autocratic style of government.

What is it about Erdogan and his government that so polarises opinion in Turkey?

Here are the some of the best reads of recent years on Erdogan and the changing dynamics of his government: Read more

♦ While most in Turkey acknowledge that every Turkish ruling class has sought to put its stamp on Istanbul, there is a growing sense that none has done so as insistently as the current government. Philip Stephens thinks Mr Erdogan’s heavy-handed response has only proved the protesters right. However, the protesters themselves have been let down on all sides, says Dani Rodrik: “Sadly, there is no organised political movement that can give voice and representation to the protesters that have made their point so loudly and clearly in recent days.”
♦ As Bradley Manning’s trial continues, he has a strong network of supporters behind him – m
ore than 20,000 people have raised $1.25m for his defence.
♦ When Ben Bernanke spoke to the graduating class at Princeton this year, he seemed to confirm his intention to retire. John Cassidy considers why he would do so despite being in good health and good standing.
♦ US infantry are training Afghan troops to take over Afghanistan’s Wardak province, while trying to protect Highway 1, the lifeline that runs between Wardak and Kabul and, ultimately, their exit route out of the country.
♦ Jonah Blank explains how the US military will have to start negotiating like the Pashtuns:
A Pashtun proverb states: ‘A man with the power to fight doesn’t need to bargain.’ For more than a decade, power and money have shielded America from the necessity of negotiation. That luxury is over.” Read more

♦ Prime Minister Erdogan blames protesters for falling stocks and does not admit to domineering policies, including plans to turn Gezi Park into a shopping mall.

♦ Patrick Cockburn predicts diplomacy will fail in Syria, as more countries and sects enter the fray.

China buys the most Iraqi oil, the New York Times reports.

Reinsurance prices fall, for the first since Katrina, as investors seek hurricane protection.

♦ The Israeli government wants mandatory military service for ultra-conservative Jewish men. Read more

Daniel Dombey

Photo by Getty

An energy and diplomacy deal that would reshape the map of the eastern Mediterranean might be proceeding faster than many people think.

It is just a few weeks since, in a bid to revive frozen diplomatic ties, Israel apologised to Turkey for a deadly raid that left nine Turkish citizens dead. The process was still sufficiently shaky for US Secretary of State John Kerry to come to Istanbul last weekend to chivvy both sides to go all the way and exchange ambassadors.

There are plenty of potential slips on the way ahead: compensation has to be agreed; the fate of Turkish court cases against retired Israeli commanders has to be decided (at present, they are going ahead); and Ankara still has to pronounce itself satisfied with the lifting of restrictions on civilian goods to Gaza (relevant, because the flotilla stormed by Israeli Defence Forces in 2010 was seeking to break the Gaza blockade). Read more

Esther Bintliff

 Read more