Slovenia

By Toby Luckhurst
  • Roula Khalaf muses on the lionising of broker Jordan Belfort in Martin Scorsese’s film, The Wolf of Wall Street.
  • Syrians have little hope for the talks in Geneva between the Assad regime and opposition forces, writes Borzou Daragahi.
  • Aboud Dandachi, a Sunni activist from Homs, describes life in the port of Tartous, an Assad stronghold.
  • The Catholic Church in Slovenia is in crisis after the “commercial misadventures” of clergy has placed the church in Maribor at risk of repossession.

 

By Luisa Frey

♦ Twenty-three years after German reunification, a report shows that east-west migration is fizzling out. As the socio-economic differences become smaller, investors are pumping capital into the ex-communist east, writes the FT’s Stefan Wagstyl.

♦ Slovenia – which cruised to the EU as the wealthiest of the 10 ex-communist members – is now struggling to avoid a eurozone bailout.

♦ In the US, inequality is moving to the front line of politics. The rich-poor gap has long been an issue, but in post-crisis times it seems more difficult to raise hopes of upward mobility.

♦ “Keeping China moving will keep its leaders busy,” comments the FT’s David Pilling. Xi Jinping – “the world’s most powerful leader” – has nine years left at the helm of an economy that could be the world’s biggest by 2020.

♦ In post-revolutionary times, Arab countries are dealing with the task of rewriting history and figuring out how to teach it. Egypt, Lybia and Tunisia are removing from school textbooks the praise they once heaped on former dictators, writes The Economist.

♦ A video report from the Wall Street Journal follows citizens whose lives were upended by the conflict across Syria’s northern border. “I always try to make my students forget what they saw in Syria”, says a teacher in a refugee camp in Turkey.