solar

John Gapper

One of the benefits – and pleasures of Davos – is the chance conversations that strike up among strangers, either in the fringes of meetings or on the shuttle buses that ferry people around town.

On Wednesday evening, I was in a shuttle bus with three other people. One of them introduced himself as Kumi Naidoo, head of Greenpeace in South Africa.

Sitting opposite him happened to be Tulsi Tanti, chairman of Suzlon, an Indian wind energy company that has an operation in South Africa. They started to talk about wind and solar energy in Africa. 

By Catherine Contiguglia
♦ The deal reached between China and the European Union on solar panel dumping may have stopped a potential trade war, but for EU Trade Commissioner Karel de Gucht, it was one more incident where his free trade crusade was dampened by the fragmented bloc he represents.
♦ Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei is funnelling billions of dollars into building the backbone of necessary communications networks throughout Africa, but has some worried that its domination of the sector creates the potential for widespread espionage.
♦ Despite multiple innovations in male contraceptives, progress towards their approval for widespread use has stagnated due to difficult barriers, particularly the lack of incentive for pharmaceutical companies to invest in a product with so many cultural and societal implications.
♦ Larry Summers should go ahead and book his summer vacation, John Cassidy writes, arguing that despite White House support, Summers has not made a great enough effort to appease Obama’s supporters by distancing himself from financial deregulation.
♦ Bradley Manning has been called many things, but a look at his background shows a conflicted young man struggling with his gender identity and personal values as a soldier in the U.S. Army. 

Sampling wine at a Shanghai wine fair (AFP)

As the China-EU solar dispute deepens, oddly enough, wine has been brought into the fray.

Here are seven interesting factoids you may (not) know about China and wine.

1. Chinese investors have bought up 30 French chateaux vineyards over the past four years and they aren’t stopping at that. There’s another 20 deals in the pipeline. Will they be affected by any probe?

2. Chinese wine importers were prominent bidders in the recent Elysee wine sale.