Switzerland

  • The prospect of intelligent machines improving human lives will depend on how the gains are produced and distributed, says Martin Wolf.
  • Hassan Rouhani has fended off the hardliners and can count on the support of the supreme leader, but this depends on his being able to secure a longer-term nuclear deal that leads to a removal of sanctions.
  • If Japan is really to put “women power” to work, it needs more revolutionary change, argues David Pilling.
  • Ugly people are oppressed and to “imagine we could ever completely overcome this kind of natural inheritance… is a fantasy” according to Jonny Thakkar, a lecturer at Princeton.
  • An Italian monastery has become a trendy atelier for brides looking to keep their wedding costs down.
  • Without immigrants, the Swiss football team would be very different.

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  • The United Arab Emirates is hoping to deliver public services using drones.
  • Mitochondrial replacement was developed in the UK, but it might be lost to the US because of government procrastination.
  • Wondering what will happen now that the Swiss have backed immigration quotas? Take a look at our Q&A on the topic.
  • Gideon Rachman looks at what it means now that two German institutions have registered objections to the policies underpinning the euro. He has also mulled over whether the EU should take punitive action over the Swiss vote – prompting quite some debate.
  • Australian authorities have published a graphic novel, seemingly aimed at deterring asylum seekers.
  • The New York Times looks at the conflict faced by Palestinians who opt to take jobs in Israeli companies in the occupied West Bank.
  • Some Russians are mourning the pre-Putin, pre-Olympic Sochi of their childhoods.

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Gideon Rachman

An electoral poster opposing the "Stop Mass Immigration" referendum Getty Images

The result of the Swiss referendum - narrowly approving restrictions on free movement of people from the European Union – presents a big dilemma for the administrations in both Bern and Brussels. The Swiss now have the massive headache of trying to renegotiate their painstakingly constructed deals with the EU – a large and angry partner. The EU has to decide how to strike the balance between indulgence and punishment, in responding to the Swiss.

Having just listened to the vice-president of the European Commission, Viviane Reding, speaking on the radio, it seems likely to me that the EU will take the punitive route. But that, I think, would be a mistake. Read more

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  • Bankers’ bonuses are to be capped at two times salary and banks will be subject to a strict transparency regime.
  • Switzerland will hold a referendum on a package of strict curbs on executive pay put forward by entrepreneur Thomas Minder, who spoke to the FT about his proposals.
  • The Turkish government is negotiating with jailed Kurdish leader Abdullah Ocalan in an effort to end a conflict that has claimed 35,000 lives in the past three decades, but doubts linger about whether a historic deal is within reach.
  • If you’ve been using your iPad as a babysitter only to find that your child has managed to rack up a steep bill for a children’s games and apps, never fear – Apple is offering a refund.
  • The Obama administration is shifting policy on Syrian rebels. It will help with training and “nonlethal assistance” – vehicles, communications equipment and night vision gear.
  • China’s defence ministry claims that rather than being the perpetrator of hacking incidents, China is the victim: “According to the IP addresses, the Defence Ministry and China Military Online websites were, in 2012, hacked on average from overseas 144,000 times a month, of which attacks from the U.S. accounted for 62.9 percent.”
  • China’s burgeoning tomato-growing industry is troubling traditional tomato-growing countries like Italy.

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Here’s our reading to take you through to the weekend  Read more