Syria crisis

David Gardner

A Yazidi family that fled Sinjar in Iraq takes shelter in the Kurdish city of Dohuk ( SAFIN HAMED/AFP/Getty Images)

Barack Obama’s decision to move back into the maelstrom of Iraq, from which he withdrew in 2011 after solemnly pledging to extricate US forces once and for all, would clearly not have been taken lightly.

Little under a year ago, after all, the president baulked at the last fence on Syria, declining to punish the Assad regime for nerve-gassing its own people – crossing a red line he had chosen to single out as inviolable. That was the wrong decision, and it is worth a moment to remember why. 

Gideon Rachman

Sergei Lavrov (Getty)

Anybody offered a gift by Sergei Lavrov would do well to inspect it rather carefully before unwrapping it. The Russian foreign minister is a tough nationalist who is not in the habit of doing the US any favours. Nonetheless, the Lavrov proposal that Syria’s chemical weapons should be placed under international supervision should be grabbed by the Obama administration for several reasons. 

Obama’s political gamble on Syria
President Barack Obama’s decision to consult Congress before launching any military strikes on Syria came as a surprise to friend and foe alike. How is this political gamble likely to work out and what are the implications for the crisis in Syria and and for the use of American power around the world? Gideon Rachman is joined by James Blitz, diplomatic editor and Richard McGregor, Washington bureau chief, to discuss