Tiananmen

  • The Obama administration has launched the most ambitious plan in US history to combat climate change by proposing to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from power stations. But business groups and Republican politicians have vigorously attacked the proposals.
  • In the run-up to the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, the FT looked at what happened to the leaders of the protests there. The South China Morning Post’s Tiananmen retrospective is rich with footage from 1989 as well as a clip from the “River Elegy” television series that argued that Chinese culture was backward and oppressive.
  • Contemplating the recent allegations over corruption and the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, Dan Hodges argues that nobody cares about football corruption – or racism, diving, biting or any of the sport’s range of controversies – because when it’s match time we are only interested in our team winning.
  • The New York Times reports on how Poland’s ardour towards the US has cooled in recent years and Poles are focusing on becoming a more integral part of Europe. The intensity of [the] love affair has diminished,” says the paper.

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  • Chinese artist and former soldier Guo Jian had lunch with the FT and recalled his part in the Tiananmen protests 25 years ago. He was arrested today.
  • Despite attempts to protect whistleblowers on Wall Street, the personal price that they pay is still high.
  • Considering economists’ forecasting failures, should their predictions be taken seriously?
  • Edward Luce “would sooner consult the star signs” and says economists looking at the US should look at rising income and wealth inequality.
  • Western leaders will be looking to use the 70th anniversary of the Normandy landings as a chance to boost the legitimacy of President Poroshenko in Kiev.
  • The Kremlin invests around €100m a year in Russian media abroad in order to influence public opinion in the West and, according to Der Spiegel, it is winning the propaganda war.
  • The US soldier traded for Taliban fighters was allegedly a deserter.
  • In Srebrenica, graves are still being turned over – as are memories and accounts of the genocide.
  • The Sunday Times reveals that millions of documents show how secret payments helped Qatar to win the World Cup bid.

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♦ In cities like Istanbul and Ankara, opposition to Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government is strong. Elsewhere, however, the AKP retains a significant amount of support and people are very suspicious of the demonstrators and their motives.
♦ China’s government and Chinese activists were even more active than usual on the Tiananmen anniversary.
♦ Susan Glasser, Foreign Policy’s editor-in-chief, interviews Sergei Lavrov, Russia’s foreign minister.
♦ When Xi Jinping meets Barack Obama on Friday, look out for Wang Huning, head of the Communist party’s central policy research office. The former university professor is one of the most influential figures in China today.
Venice is drowning in conflicting interests.
♦ Cristina Fernández has a crazy plan to save Argentina’s economy.

♦Want to know what it’s like to be in Taksim Square now? Take a look at Paul Mason’s montage. Read more