Tunisia

♦ In the new cold war, Russia could hit the US where it hurts – in Iran.

Vladimir Putin has confounded three US presidents as they tried to figure him out.

♦ The decision in Egypt to hand the death sentence to 528 Muslim Brotherhood members was widely condemned, but Egyptian TV told a different story.

♦ The US is losing its edge as an employment powerhouse after its labour participation rate fell behind the UK’s.

♦ Russia’s actions in Crimea have sent a chill through its former Soviet neighbours in Central Asia and the Caucasus.

♦ American economist Hyman Minsky is back in vogue as his ideas offer a plausible account of why the 2007-08 financial crisis happened.

♦ A report on how former Tunisian president Zein al-Abidine Ben Ali changed the rules of business underlines the challenges still facing the country. Read more

  • Glenn Greenwald has lunch with the FT and discusses his abrasive manner and new online venture.
  • Rahm Emanuel has reinvented Chicago’s political machine: the FT’s Edward Luce looks at whether he’s now aiming for the White House.
  • A divide has opened up among Britain’s high earners: the über-middle, made up of doctors and London finance workers, emerge as big winners, while millions of “cling-on” professions struggle to sustain a middle class lifestyle.
  • Students from as far afield as Mongolia, Guinea and Namibia are heading to study in northern Cyprus, where universities have become the leading sector of the economy.
  • Nicholas Shaxson talks about his work on tax havens and compares the dominance of the financial sector in London to the resource curse on countries in Africa.
  • Jihadi life is no longer the lap of luxury with the odd battle thrown in.
  • The Egyptian government’s heavy-handed crackdown on opposition is widening the generation gap.
  • A different generation game is being played in Tunisia, where there is a battle to keep young people occupied and away from extremism.

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♦ Italy’s dire jobless figures have shattered a fragile optimism as the country’s political disarray increases, writes Guy Dinmore.

♦ David Pilling looks at the emergence of anti-establishment figures in Asia who are challenging the prevailing order in a year which will see elections across the region.

♦ Chris Giles says now that the Bank of England has been proved wrong over its forecasts on unemployment it is time the governor considered raising interest rates.

♦ Foreign Policy profiles the duelling protest movements that underline the spirit of division in post-revolutionary Tunisia. The journal also shines a light on a dangerous new front it says has opened up in Syria.

♦ Barack Obama has been boasting for two years that he “ended the war in Iraq, writes Peter Baker in The New York Times, as he describes the grim aftermath left behind.

Robert Gates, who served both Republican and Democratic presidents, has lifted the lid on his time running the Pentagon. Politico reviews his candid memoirRead more

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  • Tony Barber argues that a decontamination of Italian politics must come before economic salvation, and the two issues should never be separated.
  • Clown-turned-politician Francisco Everardo Oliveira Silva was elected into the Brazilian congress with a record number of votes in 2010. However, the joy of his campaign has given away to a weariness of the politician’s life: “You pass whole days here doing nothing, just waiting to vote on something while people argue and argue.”
  • “Enemy-initiated attacks” in Afghanistan have stayed constant from 2011 to 2012. The reported 7 per cent drop was actually the result of a clerical error.
  • Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s a barrel full of pork that no longer exists. The Washington Post reports on the tiny local airports in the US that attract plenty of federal spending, but very few planes.
  • Tunisians and Egyptians have to fight for their right to do the Harlem Shake.

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By Ruona Agbroko

Here are some of the articles that have grabbed our attention from today’s FT and elsewhere:

Roula Khalaf

Muammer Gaddafi’s end was destined to be bloody. A few months ago, when the rebels were struggling and their western backers were losing patience, he could have saved his skin and that of his children and fled into exile, with the consent of his Libyan opponents and their western backers.

Even the indictment by the International Criminal Court seemed, at least for a while, open for some compromise. Read more