Vatican bank

♦ An FT investigation has uncovered the key role played by Deutsche Bank, JPMorgan and UniCredit in the reform of the Vatican bank, by refusing to provide financial services over the past two years.
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♦ Bedouin gangs in the Sinai have discovered that taking hostages is more profitable than human smuggling.
♦ Bill de Blasio’s challenge as New York mayor will be to negotiate and pay for a way out of the impasse between the administration and the unions of city workers. Read more

John Aglionby

The allegations against Monsignor Nunzio Scarano, an accountant in the Vatican’s internal accounting administration, are – albeit tangentially – the latest in a litany of scandals to affect the Vatican bank. Over the last three years, the 71-year-old Institute of Religious Works, as the bank is officially called, has been tainted by claims of money-laundering, corruption and incompetence.

The crisis began in September 2010 when it came under investigation by Italian authorities who had frozen €23m the bank was trying to transfer to accounts in Italy and Germany without releasing full details of the intended beneficiaries. The bank denied any wrongdoing. The funds were released but the investigation continues.

The Vatican responded with striking rapidity to the bank’s top two officials, Ettore Gotti Tedeschi and Paolo Cipriani, being placed under investigation; Father Frederico Lombardi, the chief spokesman, even wrote to the FT defending the two menRead more