Monthly Archives: February 2012

Kiran Stacey

Michael Gove featured heavily in today’s PMQs. Ed Miliband began his questions by asking whether the prime minister would condemn the education secretary’s recent comments that the Leveson inquiry was having a “chilling effect” on freedom of speech.

But it was during the inevitable debate on the health bill that Mr Gove played an unspoken, but important role.

Ministers seem to be changing their tone in a subtle way when defending the NHS reforms, taking on some of the tactics deployed by the education secretary when he was pushing through the Free Schools agenda.

Instead of talking up how radical the plan is, the government is now downplaying it. We hear that the bill is about “evolution, not revolution”, and more strikingly that it is building on what Labour did while they were in government.

It was this latter point that the prime minister stressed today, reeling off a list of former Labour health secretaries or advisers who back competition in the NHS (which is not the same as backing the bill, mind). He added: Read more

Kiran Stacey

House of LordsThe comments by Lord Lee in today’s FT are quite extraordinary. The Lib Dem peer opposes the coalition’s plan to reform the House of Lords to such an extent that he has threatened to quit his role as a Lords whip if it pushes ahead. He said:

There is absolutely no public demand for this at all, and pretty much zero support from serious political commentators.

He added that the coalition faced a “long, bitter and bloody battle” if it pressed ahead.

Lord Lee is not alone: we have now learned that 14 Lib Dem peers wrote a letter last year to the party leader outlining their opposition to his plans for an 80 per cent elected chamber.

In the letter, the 14 said:

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Jim Pickard

The news broke yesterday that Lord Glasman had agreed to take up a political column on Rupert Murdoch’s new Sun on Sunday newspaper, along with Toby Young.

It was a curious decision for the Labour peer given how hard Miliband has attacked Murdoch over phone hacking. Read more

Kiran Stacey

In his second answer at prime minister’s questions today, David Cameron asked a question of Ed Miliband:

As we are being kept here to vote on the publication of the NHS risk register, why don’t you ask a question about that?

It seemed like a strange tactic. Why would the prime minister, who has been ordered by the information commissioner to publish the document detailing the potential risks of his NHS bill, want to bring up the fact that he is refusing to comply? Surely this was a subject on which Labour, not the government, holds the upper hand?

Only after the prime minister had put the challenge several times did we find out why he was so keen to talk about it.  Read more

Jim Pickard

Liam Fox has been making waves this morning with this opinion piece in the Financial Times. Here is our news story off the back of it.

The intervention has been carefully timed by Fox, still in rehabilitation mode after he was forced to quit the cabinet over the Werritty saga before Christmas.

The MP is still a standard-bearer for the Tory right, in particular those who believe fervently in free markets. In his article he calls for a cut in National Insurance for employers and also for a loosening of the labour market to allow easier hiring and firing – as recommended in the controversial Beecroft report.

Many other Tory MPs share his view that the Budget needs to be a  Read more

Kiran Stacey

Protests against Tesco's work experience schemeIain Duncan Smith was once more on the attack this morning against critics of the government’s work experience scheme, under which young people are told to sign up to a four-week placement at one of a range of businesses or lose their benefits.

The scheme has been controversial for two reasons. One is that it meant young people who were claiming benefits while looking for a job were not able to do work experience in their own chosen field; instead they had to go on a government-mandated scheme at a company such as Boots, McDonald’s, Argos, Tesco or Primark. The second is it meant some of the countries’ biggest companies profiting from free labour, which is why one activist referred to it this morning as “slavery”.

Writing in the Daily Mail, the work and pensions secretary has dismissed such criticisms however, saying:

Armed with an unjustified sense of superiority and sporting an intellectual sneer, we find a commentating elite which seems determined to belittle and downgrade any opportunity for young people that doesn’t fit their pre-conceived notion of a ‘worthwhile job’.

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Kiran Stacey

David Cameron, Nick Clegg and Andrew Lansley meet medical professionalsToday’s report from the London School of Economics into whether competition works in the NHS is likely to be cherry-picked (to use an apt term) by both sides in their fights for and against the health bill.

Ministers will love its headline finding, that competition works in the NHS. The researchers found that after Labour introduced competition between hospitals in 2006, waiting times before operations (an internationally recognised measure of transparency) fell. Using the kind of terminology only academics can, the report’s authors found “moderate but statistically significant” reductions in patients’ length of stay. They added:

These 7 to 9 per cent gains would have produced non-trivial savings.

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Jim Pickard

We revealed this morning in the FT that Treasury officials believe that as many as 100 civil servants may have been paid through private companies rather than individuals – far more than had previously been thought.

That marks a major widening from the 25 at the Department of Health exposed in the Guardian yesterday. The health department admitted that many of the staff paid in this way were full-time employees and had worked in the department for years. Read more

Kiran Stacey

I wrote this week about talks between the Tories and Lib Dems about the possibility of lowering the cap for how much workers can put into their pension pots while still enjoying tax relief.

Since then a couple of pensions experts have got in touch to explain some further implications of the measure, which mean that for two reasons, it could be more controversial than I first realised.

Firstly, I suggested that people enjoying the maximum 50% tax break enjoy a 50p top-up to their pension pot for every £1 they put in.

In fact, the relief is worth even more, because the amount is a tax relief calculated on pre-tax income. So if you qualify for the 50% relief, and put in £1, your tax is waived, meaning that the government has essentially put in 50p of the £1 you put it. Cancelling this for some people would therefore be even more of a blow than I first calculated.

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Kiran Stacey

Ping pongAnother day, another Lords defeat for the government. Last night, peers voted by a majority of only 10 to moderate proposals to cut housing benefit from people in council houses who have spare rooms. Under the amendment passed, war widows, foster carers and disabled people would be exempt from the cut, which DWP says would cost £100m.

Many within Number 10 are delighted at this defeat. They say that the more peers defeat the welfare bill, the more it keeps these popular proposals in the news. It reminds voters of some of the government’s most vote-winning schemes and helps paint the Lords and Labour as out of touch. One senior coalition source told me that it was a “win-win” situation, saying:

Obviously we’d like to get the reforms through and onto the statute book, but we’re quite happy for this to go on a bit longer.

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Kiran Stacey

The Liberal Democrats have a problem. They have staked their colours clearly to the mast when it comes to raising the minimum threshold for income tax to £10,000. Most expect it to be done by the end of the parliament, if not by 2014.

The problem is, this will cost money – £4bn if it’s done by 2015, £5.5bn if it’s done by 2014 – and there isn’t much of it floating around. Lib Dems will tell you they are keen on two options to pay for this: one is to clamp down on tax avoidance; the other is to tax the pension contributions made by higher earners.

Both options are likely to make some kind of appearance in the Budget in March. But it is the latter that raises the serious money, and carries potentially serious risks for the coalition. Read more

A fortnight ago, MPs caught a fleeting glimpse of a process that has, to this point, taken place discretely: the Information Commissioner’s Office investigation into the office of Michael Gove over suspected breaches of the Freedom of Information Act.

A transcript is now available for Mr Gove’s appearance before the education select committee, when he answered questions on the topic. He said the DfE had not released data from one document in response to FoI requests because it was political.

The law is straightforward: only government data is covered by the FoI Act. Party political or private business is never captured, even if it is sent via a government email address. Official business, however it is transmitted, is always covered.

In circumstances where there is a mix of party, personal and government business, official data is released and the remainder is redacted. So the whole text would need to be party political and not official for the document not to be covered by the act.

We have published it below.

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