eu

Kiran Stacey

One of the key achievements of Britain’s veto in Brussels on Thursday night was supposed to have been that not allowing the full 27 members of the EU to sign a treaty would have stopped the 26 countries willing to go ahead using the EU’s institutions to do so.

The main effect of that would be to stop the European Commission scrutinising other countries’ budgets, and the Euroopean Court of Justice implementing the Commission’s decisions. This would make it much harder for Brussels to interfere in the fiscal plans of member states. Read more

Jim Pickard

The FT reports this morning that Michel Barnier, Europe’s top financial regulator, has shelved plans to rein in the credit rating agencies. Barnier, who is internal market commissioner, had to bow to objections elsewhere in the EU. We report that Barnier still unveiled proposals to transform the business model of the big agencies but has ordered some last-minute “technical work” that amounts to a ceasefire.

Both Barnier and the rating agencies were discussed in the House of Lords last night, where former City minister Lord Myners was on scathing form. First the Labour peer (a former chairman of Marks & Spencer) criticised the “flawed thinking” from the European Commission on the issue. He then continued:

I worry very much about Mr Barnier. I met Mr Barnier when he was a Minister. He came to see us at the Treasury. He came down the corridor and I was watching him. I am a great fan of art and I was rather impressed that he stopped to look at every painting. I thought this is a man with whom I share a common interest-until I realised he was actually looking at his reflection in the glass on every painting, and adjusting his hair or his toupee. This to me is a man whom we should treat with a very long spoon. I hope the Minister will take due care in working with Mr Barnier because we have been forewarned that this man intends to seek even more powers than those he announced today. He said he wants to return to the issue of censoring

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Kiran Stacey

Cameron, Merkel and SarkozyDavid Cameron appears to be trying to dangle some red meat in front of his restive backbenchers by holding out the prospect of using any imminent EU treaty change to try and repatriate powers back from Brussels to London.

Speaking after meeting fellow European leaders over the weekend, the PM said:

This is the right time to sort out the eurozone’s problems, defend your national interest and look to the opportunities there may be in the future to repatriate powers back to Britain. Obviously the idea of some limited treaty change in the future might give us that opportunity.

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Jim Pickard

It would be a volte-face to prompt an angry backlash from the right. But there are a few smoke signals emerging from above 10 Downing Street that a rethink of the immigration cap could be underway.

David Cameron’s spokesman insisted this morning that no decision had been made over the cap, which applies to the number of visitors from outside the EU. (The vast majority come from inside the free market and thus cannot be halted). Read more

Jim Pickard

Vince Cable has laid down the gauntlet against his own coalition government today as he stepped up his criticism of immigration policy.

Vince was talking during a Q&A after a setpiece speech. He said the cap was “doing great damage” and cited a British company that needed 500 specialists – half of which needed to come from outside the EU – but had geen given a quota of just 30. Read more