IFS

Kiran Stacey

This year is likely to be one of the hardest for the coalition, as spending cuts begin to hit harder than ever before. Tory MPs are warning that the measure that is most worrying their constituents is the removal of child benefit from higher earners, and analysis today from the Institute of Fiscal Studies gives us some inclination as to why.

The IFS has examined how much this will cost parents earning over £50,000 – the point at which the payments begin to be taken away. It has found that the measure will mean that for someone with one child who earns over £50,000, they will have a marginal tax rate of 52.6 per cent. In other words, for every extra pound earned over that level, 52.6p will be taken away. As they continue to go up the income scale, they will lose more and more cash until they hit £60,000 and all the child benefit payments are gone. This results in a marginal tax graph that looks like this:

IFS Child benefit chart

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Jim Pickard

The coalition’s promise to be the “greenest government ever” is now rather under strain after environmental groups reacted with hostility to Wednesday’s Budget – given that it provided tax relief for motorists and air passengers.

I was surprised that George Osborne, the chancellor, repeated his regular claim that the government would raise the proportion of green taxes on individuals.

Yet this is still a realistic ambition, according to the Institute of Fiscal Studies in its Budget analysis yesterday.

Having said that, the IFS said that while the target was “still on course”, the Budget had put progress back by cutting fuel duty by the equivalent of £2bn a year.

Green groups, which welcomed the commitment of £3bn of capital towards the Green Investment Bank, were disappointed that the

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Jim Pickard

Here is a link to the full ft.com story if you are interested. But the key points of this morning’s report by the Institute of Fiscal Studies – on the impact of IDS’s universal credit – is: