NHS bill

Kiran Stacey

Nick Clegg, Andrew Lansley and David Cameron at Guy's HospitalA month ago, ministers gathered round the cabinet table to be told by Andrew Lansley that the health bill was about to finally pass through parliament and become an act. Those attending banged their desks – partly in celebration, partly with pure relief. After 14 months of delays, negotiations and public rows, one of the most unpopular pieces of legislation from this session was finally about to be left behind.

Except it wasn’t. From next month MPs will start voting all over again on Lansley’s plans. What many in the coalition didn’t realise was that the act (as it now is) made so many changes to the infrastructure of the NHS that parliament will face a series of votes simply to create the bodies necessary to make them work. Clinical commissioning groups, Health Watch, Health Education England, Public Health England: the plethora of new quangos at the heart of the act all need to be legislated for. Read more