Monthly Archives: September 2011

Liz Bolshaw

A new paper, published by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation – the world’s largest foundation devoted to entrepreneurship – argues that women should be actively encouraged to start companies in greater numbers. (more…)

Liz Bolshaw

Apart from the kingdom of Brunei where no one has the vote, Saudi Arabia is the only country in the world where women are banned from the polling booth. (more…)

Rebecca Knight

What makes a company great to work for? New and stimulating challenges, for one; a collegial and professional atmosphere, for another. Regular pay increases and good training opportunities are also key. But if you’ve got small children at home, the answer may not be so clear; other things, such as a flexible work schedule, onsite childcare and generous insurance benefits are more of a priority. (more…)

Rebecca Knight

My colleagues and I here at the FT’s Women at the Top blog have written a great deal about the persistent pay gap between men and women – and the various reasons for it. (more…)

Who is the world’s most high-profile Muslim businesswoman?

When asking the question, no obvious name springs to mind.

So are the elite levels of the business and corporate world falling behind when it comes to representing the diversity of women?
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Rebecca Knight

It is official: Hewlett-Packard is once again the biggest Fortune 500 company led by a woman.

After the close of the stock market on Thursday, HP, the world’s largest computer maker by revenue, announced that Meg Whitman, the former head of Ebay, would replace Léo Apotheker as chief executive.

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Liz Bolshaw

It is something of a truism to say that men are competitive and women are co-operative in life and work. But a new study from Harvard Business School challenges this received wisdom.

Research examining how men and women respond when competing or co-operating on a given task indicates that male and female performance appears to be strongly linked to the gender of their opponent.

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Liz Bolshaw

The perception that women must be seen to be “one of the guys” in order to do well in the workplace is a common one.

It is a view partly shared by Michael Treschow, the chairman of Unilever, who told me some time ago that the dynamics of male and female upbringing can determine why women at some companies feel excluded from taking their place at the table.

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Rebecca Knight

It is hard not to be cynical about the recent announcement by Walmart, the world’s largest retail company, that it plans to use its enormous “size and scale to help empower women across its supply chain”.

The scheme – which Walmart has dubbed its Global Women’s Economic Empowerment Initiative – involves doubling the money the company spends with women-owned businesses, providing women around the world with job training and access to education and approaching its biggest suppliers to use more women and minorities on work they do for the company.
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Rebecca Knight

In this blog, my colleagues and I often write about companies that seek to help female employees move up organisations and advance their careers. Rarely, though, do we touch on how male employees perceives such initiatives.

Evan Apfelbaum, assistant professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management, usually studies how people of different races wrestle with this issue in social settings. But his work has implications for how different genders relate to each other.

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