Monthly Archives: October 2011

In one of the swankiest spot in New York’s Chinatown this week, the Women’s Venture Fund (WVF) held its 14th annual gala, and honoured two highly successful women in business, writes Devon Portney. They are Ida Liu of Citibank, and Alitia Faccone of McCarter & English, the law firm.

IBM has appointed Virginia Rometty as its first female chief executive in its 100-year history, Daniel Hadlow writes.

Liz Bolshaw

A more ambitious generation of women are becoming frustrated at work and are more likely to be job hunting, a new survey from US think-tank, the Center for Work-Life Policy Study has revealed.

Rebecca Knight

It is not easy being a woman on Wall Street. And it’s even harder being a woman of colour. According to new research from Catalyst, the non-profit group that aims to expand opportunities for women in business, those belonging to racial minority groups face greater challenges than white women in developing trusting relationships with their managers in the financial services industry.

Rebecca Knight

According to the Center for Women’s Business Research, women-owned businesses account for 40 per cent of all privately held companies – which is not too shabby. But only about 3 per cent of all of these companies have revenues of $1m or more, compared with 6 per cent of companies owned by men. According to a study by the Kauffman Foundation, just 1.8 per cent of women-owned companies have revenues above $1m.

Liz Bolshaw

Much is written about achieving a work/life balance, particularly in the context of attracting women to the upper echelons of corporate life. In the run up to the FT’s ranking of the top 50 women in world business, I have been asking some of the highest-achieving women in the world whether it is possible to “have it all”.

Rebecca Knight

My colleague, Liz Bolshaw, recently wrote in this space about new research that examines entrepreneurship’s gender gap. The study found that 29 per cent of privately held firms in the US are women-owned, but just 1.8 per cent of those firms had revenues above $1m. The study also found that women lodge less than half the number of patents of men.

Rebecca Knight

Norway has the highest level of participation of women in the boardroom than any other country in the world, having introduced a 40 per cent quota in 2003. (The quota became mandatory in 2008.)

Political leaders advocating measures in the short term to ensure a long-term solution to the global debt crisis is a concept with which we have all become familiar. But are business leaders following the mantra of short-term steps for long-term gain when it comes to their own leadership strategy?

To an outsider Germany might seem like a place where women could easily fill high-powered positions, writes Rebeka Shaid. After all, the country is governed by chancellor Angela Merkel, who Forbes recently crowned “the world’s most powerful woman”. Yet last year the German Institute for Economic Research found that over 90 per cent of the nation’s top-100 companies did not appoint one single woman to an executive positions. How can this be?

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The 'Women at the Top' blog is part of a series of online and print publications that focuses on women's achievements in business. With up-to-date news and incisive analysis, the blog will provoke discussion on the role of the world's most prominent businesswomen. www.ft.com/womenblog

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About our bloggers

Liz Bolshaw

Liz Bolshaw is a business journalist and editor. She has been a successful book publisher, online editor, magazine editor and publisher.

She was launch editor of the Europe-wide online community Entrepreneur Country, has published magazines for PwC, 3i, dunhill and Bafta, and launched The Sharp Edge, a magazine for and about entrepreneurs, with Duncan Bannatyne. She is a regular contributor to Thomson Reuters’ Venture Capital Journal.

Her last project for the Financial Times was as editor of the paper’s Business Education magazine.

Rebecca Knight

Rebecca Knight is a freelance journalist based in Boston. She writes regularly for the FT on business education, entrepreneurship, and management.

Andrew Hill

Andrew Hill is an associate editor and the management editor of the FT. He was City editor of the FT and editor of the daily Lombard column on British business and finance from September 2006 to December 2010.

He was the FT’s financial editor from June 2005 to September 2006, with overall responsibility for coverage of companies and markets. Before becoming financial editor, he was the FT’s comment & analysis editor, in charge of the paper’s opinion and features pages.

From 1999 to 2003, he was the FT’s New York bureau chief. He joined the FT in 1988 and has also worked as foreign news editor, UK companies reporter and correspondent in Brussels and Milan.

Pino Bethencourt

Pino Bethencourt is a professor and leadership expert at IE Business School in Madrid. She is also an author and executive coach.

Lynda Gratton

Lynda Gratton is professor of management practice at London Business School.

Linda Tarr-Whelan

Linda Tarr-Whelan, former ambassador to the UN commission on the status of women, is a Demos distinguished senior fellow.