Andrew Hill

Thanks for reading the FT Women at the Top blog.

We’re taking a break from blogging here, but coverage of women in business will continue in the main body of the FT and on, as well as on the FT Women at the Top page, which we will update with regular online features. You can also watch our video interviews with top businesswomen there and see our interactive ranking of the Top 50 Women in World Business 2011. Past posts to this blog will stay archived on this page.

Let me thank you, on behalf of the FT, for your comments and encouragement. If you wish to make suggestions for the next phase of our coverage, please leave comments under this post, or, if you prefer, via email to Hugo Greenhalgh, Editor, Special Reports (Magazines & Websites) at

In the meantime, best wishes for the holiday season from all of us at the FT.

Andrew Hill

A new report from Britain’s Equality and Human Rights Commission – Sex and Power 2011 – contains a headline-grabbing factoid:

If women were to achieve equal representation among Britain’s 26,000 top positions of power, the Commission estimates that 5,400 ‘missing’ women would rise through the ranks to positions of real influence.

Andrew Hill

Two things stood out from my recent video interview* with Laurence Parisot, head of Medef, the French employers’ federation: one frivolous, one deadly serious. The first was that Parisot said that, aged nine, she had hoped to be “number one” in water-skiing (and, less surprisingly, in business or politics). The second was her equation of misogyny with racism.

Andrew Hill

As companies strive to meet targets – and, in a few countries, mandatory quotas – for women on corporate boards, one of the hardest myths to dispel is the lack of supply.

Andrew Hill

Simon Murray’s curriculum vitae – complete with a stint in the Foreign Legion, a love of helicopter flying and a penchant for endurance running – suggests he is an old-fashioned man’s man. But man’s men have learnt to keep to themselves any unreconstructed views on women in business. Instead, the newly appointed chairman of Glencore ran straight into a wall of criticism after telling the UK’s Sunday Telegraph that women are “not so ambitious in business as men because they’ve better things to do. Quite often they like bringing up their children…”

Andrew Hill

Sylvia Ann Hewlett has offered a glimpse of her new study with Ripa Rashid into the aspirations and fears of Chinese women in business.

As she writes in her Harvard Business Review blog, the lesson for companies that wish to tap this talent pool is a simple one:

Supporting China’s qualified women isn’t just a nice thing to do. It’s absolutely necessary.

Andrew Hill

“Institutionalised discrimination”, prejudice, “group think” and patriarchy are among the main obstacles for women wishing to progress to the corporate heights, according to respondents to the FT’s first Women at the Top survey.

The FT asked a deliberately provocative question: “Are women their own worst enemies when it comes to achieving diversity in the boardroom?” Seventy-five per cent of respondents said no, but women (and men) who provided additional comments put some interesting gloss on their responses.

Andrew Hill

Aude de Thuin,  founder of the Women’s Forum for the Economy and Society, has stepped back from management of the forum and sold her shares to Publicis.

That’s a bigger step than it sounds. Publicis has had majority control of the Forum’s parent company since 2009, but I can testify, having met de Thuin and attended the first few annual conferences in Deauville (the FT used to be one of its media partners), that she was the heart of the event.

Andrew Hill

Jack Welch – once a self-confessed “neanderthal” on women in business – is perhaps the last person you’d expect to fret about the “glass cliff”.

But when I interviewed him a few years ago, he said he was worried that if three prominent female chief executives failed to meet the big challenges they faced it would set back the cause of getting more women into the boardroom. The trio were Pat Russo at Lucent (later Alcatel-Lucent), Anne Mulcahy of Xerox and Carly Fiorina, then CEO of Hewlett-Packard.

Andrew Hill

Davos has struggled to shake its alpha-male image, despite its best efforts. Fewer than a fifth of leaders present last year were women.

Hence the flurry of interest in the World Economic Forum’s efforts to increase the number of women attending this year’s conference by insisting on quotas.

This blog is no longer updated but it remains open as an archive.

The 'Women at the Top' blog is part of a series of online and print publications that focuses on women's achievements in business. With up-to-date news and incisive analysis, the blog will provoke discussion on the role of the world's most prominent businesswomen.

For more Women at the Top news, video interviews and other features, visit


About our bloggers

Liz Bolshaw

Liz Bolshaw is a business journalist and editor. She has been a successful book publisher, online editor, magazine editor and publisher.

She was launch editor of the Europe-wide online community Entrepreneur Country, has published magazines for PwC, 3i, dunhill and Bafta, and launched The Sharp Edge, a magazine for and about entrepreneurs, with Duncan Bannatyne. She is a regular contributor to Thomson Reuters’ Venture Capital Journal.

Her last project for the Financial Times was as editor of the paper’s Business Education magazine.

Rebecca Knight

Rebecca Knight is a freelance journalist based in Boston. She writes regularly for the FT on business education, entrepreneurship, and management.

Andrew Hill

Andrew Hill is an associate editor and the management editor of the FT. He was City editor of the FT and editor of the daily Lombard column on British business and finance from September 2006 to December 2010.

He was the FT’s financial editor from June 2005 to September 2006, with overall responsibility for coverage of companies and markets. Before becoming financial editor, he was the FT’s comment & analysis editor, in charge of the paper’s opinion and features pages.

From 1999 to 2003, he was the FT’s New York bureau chief. He joined the FT in 1988 and has also worked as foreign news editor, UK companies reporter and correspondent in Brussels and Milan.

Pino Bethencourt

Pino Bethencourt is a professor and leadership expert at IE Business School in Madrid. She is also an author and executive coach.

Lynda Gratton

Lynda Gratton is professor of management practice at London Business School.

Linda Tarr-Whelan

Linda Tarr-Whelan, former ambassador to the UN commission on the status of women, is a Demos distinguished senior fellow.